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Old Sep 30, 2003, 9:35 PM   #1
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Default Camera For Extreme Macros?

Hi there,

I currently own an olympus C700 and am using diopters and a reversed 50mm lens to get some pretty extreme closeups. Magnification between 1:1 and 5:1

The quality of the pictures when using the diopters isn't the best though and I can only use the 50mm lens (ZUIKO 50mm F1.8 OM) at full tele zoom to avoid viginetting. I'd love to have more use of the zoom when using this lens.

Can anyone recommend to me a better camera for extreme closeups? I've seen some pretty amazing results from a cannon G3.

Paul
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Old Sep 30, 2003, 10:18 PM   #2
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Not a better camera, but maybe a better lens!!!

Closeup filters (+1, +2, etc.) aren't the best...what you should look at instead is a macro converter.

Here's some general info:
http://www.jimdoty.com/Tips/Closeup/closeup.html

An example macro converter, the DCR-150 and DCR-250 on the Olympus C-700:
http://www.raynox.co.jp/comparison/d...uz.htm#dcr-150

Raynox's page showing the lenses on the C-700:
http://www.raynox.co.jp/english/digital/egolyc700uz.htm

I'm a C-700 user who's been considering the options of a closeup filter and a macro converter.

- Check out the Oly_C-700 Yahoo Group, discussions, fun assignments for all C-7x0 users:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Oly_C-700/
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Old Oct 1, 2003, 1:07 AM   #3
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Yeah I've seen the Raynox lenses before on the net... I'd need to be able to test them before I bought them and no shops around here have any in stock.

Have you actually used the DCR-250? What is the viggenetting like at lower zoom levels and just how much magnification can be had? Somewhere on the net I read it was between 2.5 and 3:1

Thanks

Paul

P.S. I'm already a memeber of the Oly group. If you read the forums you've probably already seen my macros.
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Old Oct 1, 2003, 7:23 AM   #4
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Default Re: Camera For Extreme Macros?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spadge_101
Hi there,

I currently own an olympus C700 and am using diopters and a reversed 50mm lens to get some pretty extreme closeups. Magnification between 1:1 and 5:1

The quality of the pictures when using the diopters isn't the best though and I can only use the 50mm lens (ZUIKO 50mm F1.8 OM) at full tele zoom to avoid viginetting. I'd love to have more use of the zoom when using this lens.

Can anyone recommend to me a better camera for extreme closeups? I've seen some pretty amazing results from a cannon G3.

Paul
Believe it or not I use that same olympus slr lens with my canon a70. I also have to go to full telephoto. The reason that you have to go to full telephoto is that it is an f1.8 lens. A larger apature on the slr lens will allow you to use a little of the zoom range (I couldn't tell you how much). You may want to go to a local camera shop and see if they have a used slr lens that is faster that you can try. They make ones that are f1.4 and f1.2. The f1.4 are very common and should not be hard to find used. I think the f1.2 al a little less common but you still may be able to find one for a good price.
If you can find a good deal on one used, it would certainlly be cheaper than a new camera and might expand your capabilities a little.
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Old Oct 1, 2003, 8:48 AM   #5
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I don't think it's the lens speed that is the problem. I can stop it down to F2.8 (by holding the button on the side) and there is no change...

I think the limitation (for me anyway) is the size of the rear lens opening. Are there lenses out there with a larger opening at the rear? This one is about 25mm in diameter.

Thanks for the replies so far
Paul
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Old Oct 1, 2003, 9:00 AM   #6
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You may want to try and locate a used Nikon Coolpix (one of the swivel bodied models -- CP 950, 990, 995, 4500).

They can capture a field of view as small as 0.7 inches, with virtually no distortion -- no add-on lenses needed.

See Phil Askey's Macro tests for the Coolpix 995 here (the older split bodied Nikons work just as well):

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikoncp995/page20.asp

Here's the same type of test for the newer Coolpix 4500:

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/nikoncp4500/page15.asp

Even the older 2MP Coolpix 950 can do this well.

These cameras can be found on Ebay at bargain prices.

Nikon also offers a Macro Light (SL-1), which iluminates your subject with a ring of white LED's. It simply attaches to the front of the lens (and it will work with all of the swivel bodied Nikons). It's under $100.00 from most any dealer.
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Old Oct 2, 2003, 11:21 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Spadge_101
I don't think it's the lens speed that is the problem. I can stop it down to F2.8 (by holding the button on the side) and there is no change...

I think the limitation (for me anyway) is the size of the rear lens opening. Are there lenses out there with a larger opening at the rear? This one is about 25mm in diameter.

Thanks for the replies so far
Paul
This is just a guess as I am no expert when it comes to slr lenses, but with the olympus lens I have (I am pretty sure it is the same as yours), Looking backwards through the lens, you can see that When the lens is set to f1.8, with the buttons pushed or not, it is the lens at the rear bayonette mount that is limiting apature to f1.8 (the apature blades are pulled completly out of the way). For the lens To be faster, like an f1.4, That rear lens (or front lens with the lens backwards) would have to be larger because that is the only way it would be able to allow more light in.
Reguardless of wether my logic is flawed on that point or not, the one thing I can say for sure is that there are lenses that will have less vinyetting/allow more zoom and apature defanatlly seems to be a factor. The distance from the filter threads on the front of the lens and the lens element is a factor too, and the geometry of the lens elements play a part too.
There are two ways I know there to be other lenses that will vinyette less. The first is that The canon g series cameras need much larger glass with any kind of lens to avoid vinyetting compared to my canon a70. A lens that just gets rid of vinyetting at full zoom on the g series mounted on my a70 allows use of a portion of the zoom range. If memory serves, g series users have to use f1.2/f1.4 lenses to do reversed slr macro because of this.
The other reason is that I am discussing the same issue of vinyetting and apature with reversed slr lenses on another forum with other a70 users (I know yours is not a canon but it is the same thing that is causing the vinyetting problem). One person reported using a nikon f1.8 e series lens and was able to use two steps of the zoom (I have to go to full telephoto on the olympus). Another person that uses a pentax (takumar) f1.4 lens reported that he had to zoom in 2 steps to just get rid of vinyetting (the canon a70 has 6 zoom steps or 7 if you consider wide angle a step) so he has 5 zoom positions that are usable.
I am not sure if you are looking at new or used slr lenses but I am assuming used as you can get them very cheap. I paid 20$ for the olympus in good condition. If any of the local camera shops have used slr lenses I would see if they will let you screw a few on or at least hand hold them in front of the camera to see what you get. I think your chances are pretty good of finding something that will allow use of some or most of the zoom range.
Two other things you may want to look into. If you can find used lenses cheap locally you may want to consider two lenses, a 50mm and perhaps a 100mm (I am not sure if that is a good focal length, I just threw that number out there as an example). Lenses that are intended to be more telephoto on an slr, give less magnification when reversed for macro, so maybe you could find a second intermediate power lens.
Another possible option would be a variable power slr lens though I am not sure if they make a sutable one. The first slr lens I got was a variable power as I really didn't ask around enough and didn't know what to buy (it was only 20$ though). I goes from 150mm to 70mm and then continues on to a point marked close focus (somewhere below 50mm) and works as a variable power macro lens. Unfortunatlly it is an f3.8 lens so it vinyetts reguardless but it does effectively provide variable macro power (though if I stack it with a teleconverter it does not vinyette and does extreme closup, and is variable power). I am not sure if they make such a thing, but perhaps there are lenses with a similar zoom range with a faster appature.
If you do decide to get another camera, as JimC said, the nikons have very good macro capabilities, but personally I would explore the much cheaper option of other lenses first before I would go get a new camera.
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