Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jul 19, 2008, 10:51 PM   #11
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 8
Default

The ISO on the 2nd pic. Was at 400 I was trying all different setting for I wasn't liking at all what I was seeing after I would take a pic. And I wasn't happy with a lot of the day shots as well as to night ones tooall the stills they look great its just the ones that have movement to them I'm not happy with at all Ihave plans to go back to the same track the 2nd. weekend in Aug. on a Fri. and Sat. witch is a little ways off yet but when I do after I down load then on my laptop I will leave them alone so then I can post then and then see what they look like and post the data with them. If you have ideals of some setting that I could try I will give them a try and see what happens
ronss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 21, 2008, 9:04 AM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Davenport, IA
Posts: 2,093
Default

At the start line I'd think you'd want at least 1/250 sec shutter speed if you use good panning technique but during daylight hours 1/500 to 1/1000 should be achievable at base or only slightly elevated ISOs.Slower shutter speed can be used if the subject is moving directly toward you or away from you andfaster shutter speeds are required when subject is crossing the field of view at 90[suP]o[/suP]. I would also use the half shutter press technique to pre-focus and reduce shutter lag.

I really have some doubts about any success at night. I'd reduce the mega-pixels and use ISO 800. I'd probably move closer so I could use a short enough focal length to have f/2.8 available. Use as much shutter speed as you can get and still have correct exposure. Lose the -.7 exposure compensation. Use either manual focus or half-press pre-focus. Pan.

I don't really see any reason you can't get good daytime pics. The subjectsare different but all were moving at a pretty good clip: http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...mp;forum_id=82. These were shot with my Kodak Z612 which has a bit faster auto-focus and less shutter lag but not that dramatic a difference. The EXIF is included with the files.

A. C.


ac.smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 21, 2008, 11:29 AM   #13
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

ac.smith wrote:
Quote:
Slower shutter speed can be used if the subject is moving directly toward you or away from you andfaster shutter speeds are required when subject is crossing the field of view at 90[suP]o[/suP]. I would also use the half shutter press technique to pre-focus and reduce shutter lag.
Actually, it's the exact opposite. If your subject is moving toward or away you need faster shutter speeds (because the subject is changing focal planes and if you have a slow shutter speed the subject will change focal planes during the shot).

When panning at a 90 degree angle it isn't as important to get a fast shutter speed. The key to success is your pan matching the speed of the subject. Even during daylight you want a slower shutter speed though in a pan technique. You'll find that with faster speeds it's more difficult to get the sense of motion.
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 21, 2008, 1:52 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Davenport, IA
Posts: 2,093
Default

JohnG wrote:
Quote:
Actually, it's the exact opposite. If your subject is moving toward or away you need faster shutter speeds (because the subject is changing focal planes and if you have a slow shutter speed the subject will change focal planes during the shot).

When panning at a 90 degree angle it isn't as important to get a fast shutter speed. The key to success is your pan matching the speed of the subject. Even during daylight you want a slower shutter speed though in a pan technique. You'll find that with faster speeds it's more difficult to get the sense of motion.
A point on the optical axis and moving alongthe opticaxis will not move across the sensor plane with a change in distance regardless of the rate of change. A point off the optical axis will move across the sensor plane as the subject size changes. The rate of movement across the sensor plane will depend both subject magnification (image size) and the velocity. Movementof a point not along theoptical axis will increase the movement of a point across the sensor due to velocity while reducing the movement due to changing image size. Maximum movement of the point across the sensor due to subject velocity will occur when the subject point is moving at 90[suP]o[/suP]across the optical axis.

This in no way argues against panning. I used panning for every shot in my airshow sampler. Noram I argueing that panning does notreduce the shutter speed below what would be required for a stationary camera. As a side note the angular rotation of the camera when correctly tracking a moving subject is greatestwhen the subject is at 90[suP]o[/suP] and least when the subject is near 0[suP]o[/suP] and 180[suP]o[/suP].

Nor do I disagree that having the subject sharp while background is blurred does provide a sense of motion but the OP want to get some sharp photos first.
ac.smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 21, 2008, 3:11 PM   #15
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 8
Default

When panning like at a drag race you will have a background so if you have your setting right and following the car as it goes down the track your background will be blurred is that not right and hope that the subject (car) is sharp? To get both sharp as the car is moving how would that be done? You would have to use different setting for the day and night would you not and the again the same if you wanted the car sharp and the background blurred? But I'm thanking it would be easer to follow the car and hope to have your setting right and the car be sharp and the background blurred? I may be wrong but I'm thanking to it would be nice to learn how to do it both ways (car sharp and background blurred) and (car and background sharp) (that is moving) depending on what effect you are trying to show would that not be the thing to do?
ronss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 21, 2008, 4:03 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Davenport, IA
Posts: 2,093
Default

When panning like at a drag race you will have a background so if you have your setting right and following the car as it goes down the track your background will be blurred is that not right and hope that the subject (car) is sharp? It's more than a hope, it can be done a high percentage of the time in daylight. To get both sharp as the car is moving how would that be done? Use high enough shutter speed while the camera is still and both subject and background will be sharp enough. At the drag starting line 1/1000-1/1600 might work.You would have to use different setting for the day and night would you not and the again the same if you wanted the car sharp and the background blurred? You would have to use the SAME shutter speed settings and that's the rub. You don't have enough light to use the same settings at night unless you can increase the ISO enough to compensate for the lack of light. But I'm thanking it would be easer to follow the car and hope to have your setting right and the car be sharp and the background blurred? I recommend panning for two reasons, 1) It keeps the subject framed properly in the lag time between when you actually press the shutter and the camera fires and 2) Reduces the required shutter speed to keep the subject sharp.I may be wrong but I'm thanking to it would be nice to learn how to do it both ways (car sharp and background blurred) and (car and background sharp) (that is moving) depending on what effect you are trying to show would that not be the thing to do? Both can probably be done with your camera in full daylight, it's all in the control of shutter speed. At night you're up against the wall. If you can get usable exposure (that is you can see what you want to see even if it's blurred) using ISO 400, 1/10 sec. & f/3.2 then you will need to raise the ISO to 6400 to get a shutter speed of 1/120 sec. which I suspect will be about the minimum you need to get the subject sharp while panning. You won't get every shot but you'll get a percentage. Obviously your camera can't be set at ISO 6400 andnot allthose cameras than can be set at 6400 should be|:-)

You might try an alternate approach at night for a different kind of shot. Use a tripod, use manual exposure set with ISO 400, 1 sec and f/8. Watch the starting lights and fire the shutter just as the they start the countdown. The background should be sharp, there should be a sharp but dark image of the car and streaks of light going down the strip. The settings I'm giving are not gospel, just a starting point.

ac.smith is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 9:36 AM.