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Old Oct 16, 2003, 9:09 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by DarkThrone
I read in SourceForge that there are many cases of "Digital Theft" in Japan. What is it? Well, we all know the sudden surge of mobile phones with mediocre CMOS cameras right? People are using them to take snapshots of almost anything, like an article from a magazine, an image of a tabloid, a story off the frontpage of a newspaper, or even the centerfold off of this month's Playboy!

There has been a fall in sales at bookstores because of this.
I know you didn't mean anything by this statement (you're repeating something you heard, not making a political statement) but I felt compelled to comment. Although everything in the first statement is probably true (cell phone usage was higher in Japan than the majority of the world and more cell phones have cameras, so that type of theft is probably more common there) I would like to argue against the conclusion. It is probably not true that it is the cause of "a fall in sales in bookstores". Unless Japan is very different than the rest of the world, (in general) magazine subscriptions have been declining for many years and many magazines have been going under. I see no reason to believe that in a fast pased, tech savy country like Japan the same things aren't happening there(less time to read them, cheaper alternatives to get the same information... the net.)

I could be completely off base here, but this argument sounds like something that an industry association has made. A statement that is more political than factual. It is almost exactly the same argument that the RIAA has been making over the years about music sharing. Last I heard, the recording industry has released fewer new albums year over year for the past several years. They have gone through their back album collection and rereleased everything they care to rerelease years ago (wonder why they push movie sound tracks so hard?). So people are buying fewer albums. It also doesn't help that the population is getting older (it was larger 10 years ago.) They can turn out as many 'nSync albums they want, I won't buy one. The audience for a lot of what they sell is getting smaller, not larger. And there are more pulls on that audience's money than ever before.

I am sure that people steal music. And I'm sure that many of them don't buy some music because they got it for free (some do buy it after "trying it", but I bet many don't.) But what the RIAA is doing is attacking a problem that will only get worse in the future (as the stealing and burning of CDs becomes easier.) They fear that technology will make their current revenue streams go away (which it probably will) but they don't want to adapt to it, they want to kill it.

Ok, I've digressed enough. Sorry, but political/marketing distortion of facts ("There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics.") always bothers me.

Eric
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Old Oct 16, 2003, 9:27 AM   #32
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Eric -- Very good analysis. When an industry starts showing signs of failure, it's most often due to more than just one thing as you noted so well. For instance, in the world of magazines, the rise in postal rates was one of the first chinks in its armor. The rates helped kill The Saturday Evening Post, for instance. And book sales? Why would someone pay $30 for a novel if he can get it for free at the library? I'm not so sure readership has descended along with bookstore profits. I've noticed my local libraries have more people wandering about in them than wandered there twenty years ago.

Just adding a few thoughts to yours.

--Barbara
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Old Oct 16, 2003, 10:07 AM   #33
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I've noticed my local libraries have more people wandering about in them than wandered there twenty years ago.
This is true in UK libraries too, BUT instead of rows of book titles which few would read and a drab dreary environment, we now have music CD's, DvD's, audio casettes, internet access and point of sale goods. Here I think libraries have faced the reality of the changing market place and consumer needs by becoming 'media lenders and service providers', rather than a book exchange outlet.

Businesses need to understand changes in their operating environment and adapt to survive - rather than protect to survive which is often the mentality.VOX
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Old Oct 16, 2003, 11:49 AM   #34
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I can't speak for the entire U.S., but where I live, though the libraries have enlarged their sections of music, movies, and audio books, the bulk is still old-fashioned ink on paper. Perhaps the patrons are wandering in to see what's new on CD, but most of them are wandering back out with one or more books under an arm. The library has mutated, but I hope that books never die.
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Old Oct 16, 2003, 12:07 PM   #35
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In reply to Eric's post:

Maybe the reading material in Japan costs more than a 16 MB CF card... No wonder people are flocking over to bookstores copying everything they fancy... :lol:

Regarding the topic:

I've heard some people are using their Cameras as their WebCam, although I'm unsure how they do it, maybe someone here can enlighten us! :?
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Old Oct 16, 2003, 2:17 PM   #36
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..........I've heard some people are using their Cameras as their WebCam............

Some cams in their menu can be set to stream live pic data over usb to use as a webcam. The hook with Fuji if I remember, is you use their software shipped with the cam (most unload it quick) and it works through their proxy server for which you register.

In the end the downside is your expensive megapix cam gets used at 320X240 pix, is powered continuously which might shorten life and you aren't using it as a photo cam. So generally it's better to hook up a cheap webcam. Now the thing most Fuji but not all other cams lack, is a remote control facility for pc controlled time lapse photography - I'd choose that over the webcam. VOX
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Old Oct 16, 2003, 3:48 PM   #37
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Whenever I am brainstorming project plans or blasting ideas onto a large whiteboard at work, I frequently find myself running out of room. To solve the problem, I simply digitally photograph my hard-to-read notes and lines and arrows and boxes and graphs so I can turn them into business acceptable junk later on. I'd NEVER have done that with a film camera.

My Oly is a creativity booster to be sure!

Dave

(The difference between me 'n my camera? One of us takes good pictures, the other aims the camera.)
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