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Old Aug 26, 2008, 8:30 PM   #1
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It makes sense at first that when you remove the lens to change lenses foreign objects can get / fall / blown into the camera body. But just how likely is it for dust to fall on the sensor?
Remember that under most conditions when you remove the lens the mirror is down and the shutter is closed, so the sensor should not be exposed. The mirror should be what is the most exposed to dust, and I guess you might see that in the viewfinder.
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Old Aug 26, 2008, 9:38 PM   #2
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kscharf wrote:
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It makes sense at first that when you remove the lens to change lenses foreign objects can get / fall / blown into the camera body. But just how likely is it for dust to fall on the sensor?
Remember that under most conditions when you remove the lens the mirror is down and the shutter is closed, so the sensor should not be exposed. The mirror should be what is the most exposed to dust, and I guess you might see that in the viewfinder.
True, but that mirror flips around a lot in there, and it is likely to stir things up.

I have multiple lenses, and I like to play with them. I've had my dLSR for over two years and I've only cleaned the sensor once.
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Old Aug 27, 2008, 8:17 AM   #3
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Dust has always been a problem with any SLR/dSLR camera. When using film it would usually be pushed aside when advancing to the next frame. With a dSLR then there is a charge that helps to attract the dust and yes there is a mirror in the way but there is plenty of room for the dust to get around and as TCAV said when the mirror is activated then the movement helps to move the dust around more.

I've just been in Egypt and there I had to clean the sensor a couple of times as it is much more dusty than in the UK. Usually I clean my cameras before shooting a wedding and that's about it.

It's a simple process using a blower, I've never had any dust that has been so stubborn that I've had to do anything else. Basically don't worry about it.

Yes you are right in the view finder it is the mirror and internal focus point screen that will mainly be showing dust, also on the view finder itself.You can't see what is on the sensor (unless you have live view) until a shot is taken. To see if you have any dust shoot at a clean subject (I usually choose the sky or a wall) with a narrow aperture (f11, f16 etc) and you will clearly see what you have there.
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Old Aug 27, 2008, 8:34 AM   #4
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I've had a dSLR camera for several years now also and have only had to use a hand air blower occasionally. I change lenses all the time, being somewhat careful how I do it though. For instance, I always turn my back to the wind when it's windy, have the new lens in my right hand, aligned correctly to the camera. I use a finger to push the button to release the old lens, using my left hand to remove it while putting the new one on with my right hand. It's a bit awkward at first, but it means that the camera body is exposed for barely a second, and protected on 3 sides by your body and the two lenses as one comes off and the other goes on.

I'm not saying that you'll never have to clean your sensorif youthis method to change lensesor that I'll never have to do it. It's just that I think the dust issue is often over-rated.

P.S. I use a Pentax camera that has a dust alert option. I thought it was mostly a gimmick when I bought the camera (having always used the sky before) but I've found it very useful - I can check for dust indoors, when it's dark out.

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Old Sep 5, 2008, 3:20 AM   #5
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Two comments:

1) dust is generally easy to elimintate with Photoshp and similar but it is time consuming.

2) If you want to see how dirty your sensor is, take a pic of a light neutral coloured wall or similar...you'll more than likely see small fuzzy circles (dust) or small shapes which are usually metallic particles from changing lenses.
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Old Sep 11, 2008, 2:07 PM   #6
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I'm pretty new to the world of DSLR's. I was wondering, as I may be getting a used camera, how would I go about cleaning the sensor?
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Old Sep 11, 2008, 2:13 PM   #7
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Here is some good info for you http://www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com/methods.html

Hope they help but as said I just use a blower.
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