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Old Sep 8, 2008, 7:08 PM   #1
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I have a digital camerra that has f/s from 2.8 to 8.0. I need to take a picture of a pair of female dancers legs (she will pose for the shot in a dance studio). She will be wearing a blackshort skirtclear nylons and black heels with a full wall mirror behind her. What is the best f/s to use to get the skirt andlegs in focus or at least the pirmary focus oif the picture and the mirror out of focus or not showing that much.

I am assuming I want a large appaerture to throw the background out of focus so would f/s 2.8 with the use of the flash be good. I know their is a mirror involved just wondering what is the best method. I don;t want harsh flash to show from mirror reflections but its gonna be 9pm at night with medium indoor lighting.


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dave

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Old Sep 8, 2008, 8:13 PM   #2
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Likely your "medium indoor lighting" will be very dim.

You didn't say what camera you are using - in particular if it is a dSLR or a digicam. If it is a digicam, you are going to have a large depth of field even at f/2.8

You are right: flash and mirrors are at best difficult to deal with.

The best suggestion I can give is to go practice with something like a pair of tall boots and some broomsticks. That way you can figure it out without the dancer/model getting tired of standing about while watching you chimping.
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Old Sep 8, 2008, 8:31 PM   #3
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Take a look at DOFMaster.com to see how much depth of field you can expect. And a lot will depend on the size of the studio.

And if you've got lots of time, try everything. She can probably hold still longer than the average person, so you can probably get away with longer that average shutter speeds.

In addition, some P&S digicams have lenses that are either f/2.8 or f/8.0, not from f/2.8 to f/8.0, so if that's what you have to use, that would limit the possibilities.
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Old Sep 8, 2008, 9:50 PM   #4
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As Tcav says, check out the link for specifics. Depth of field varies with focal length as well as f/stop, so try your shot from various distances and zoom in to get your framing right. If you don't have enough light to shoot without flash, remember that you don't have to shoot straight into the mirror. Adjusting shooting angle and distance can also give you more interesting photos. Good luck.

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Old Sep 8, 2008, 10:34 PM   #5
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Another option is to shoot into the mirror to capture the reflection of the subject.

MAKE SURE THE MIRROR IS CLEAN!!!

Get there early and clean it yourself!
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Old Sep 8, 2008, 10:49 PM   #6
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Fuji S9100 is the camera a prosumer bridge camera. Flash is the Sunpack 383 Ausperauto model.



The camera in APperature mode has settings from 2.8 to 8.0



Thanks for the advice



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Old Sep 8, 2008, 10:52 PM   #7
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I basically have an idea how to do it if the mirror was there and the three walls minus the entery way all have mirrors wall to ceiling...... Thats way I am asking hoping someone has experience doing this before me.

Anyway thanks for all the advice given.

dave
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Old Sep 8, 2008, 11:38 PM   #8
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dave, if you find that you can't get the shallow dof that you want, there's always software.

Depending on what editor you use, it isn't very hard to apply some selective blur to whatever portion of the photo you want.

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Old Sep 9, 2008, 12:22 AM   #9
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The easiest answer is to remove the mirror from the equation. Cover it up - then use flash. Here a very cheap king-size sheet works as a backdrop:


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Old Sep 9, 2008, 6:47 AM   #10
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Great example from JohnG, the backdrop doesn't need to be white as long as its of uniform color can easily be selected and removed with the color picker, and replaced (the weather man on TV does it everyday).

Like what was suggested with the previous post there's always selective blurring
-> From my experience one rarely shoots wide open in a studio for lack of sharpness...
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