Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Nov 13, 2008, 12:58 PM   #21
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

peripatetic wrote:
Quote:
Trust the cloud!!
JimC wrote:
Quote:
I did that one time before. The company that owned the site I used went "belly up" without any warning at all until the servers were no longer available and press releases hit about their financial problems. ;-)
P.S.

The site was photopoint.com (which many photographers relied on for image storage).

They went bankrupt in 2002 and shut down, leaving over 1.5 Million users without access to their images (although some former employees did eventually offer to sell CDs with images back to subscribers).

I use external hard drives for my backups.

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 13, 2008, 7:54 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Decatur, GA
Posts: 2,053
Default

I keep one copy of my photos on an external storage drive inside netgear storage central and another deplicate copy of DVD-R (Memorex brand - I used other inthe past but since Jan 2006 that is all I use DVD-R or CD-Rs 90% DVD). Each DVD or CD becomes a folder on the external drive with the same name asI titlethe DVD. Since I started this system in Jan 2006 I have yet to loose any images except for 2 DVDs that I was burning and the power went out mid burn-- luckily I always write the images to the external drive first.

I am currently using a seagate 750 7200rpm esata (?? spelling -- not the IDE type but the other type of drve) drive for photo backup and another 750GB drive for computer backup and storage of some video related files. I've only filled about 400GB of the drive so far and when the drive fills I will put it in an enclouser and mount a new drive in the storage central box.

I'd burn on copy to a realiable branded external hard drive and then burn a DVD of the images. Also if you really worried burn another DVD and out in a safe deposit box.

dave
Photo 5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 13, 2008, 11:39 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
ImKayd1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 1,785
Default

I have a couple of external Hard Drives that are never plugged in except when backing up.

Suzan
ImKayd1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 14, 2008, 2:00 AM   #24
Super Moderator
 
peripatetic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 3,599
Default

JimC wrote:
Quote:
peripatetic wrote:
Quote:
Trust the cloud!!
JimC wrote:
Quote:
I did that one time before. The company that owned the site I used went "belly up" without any warning at all until the servers were no longer available and press releases hit about their financial problems. ;-)
P.S.

The site was photopoint.com (which many photographers relied on for image storage).

They went bankrupt in 2002 and shut down, leaving over 1.5 Million users without access to their images (although some former employees did eventually offer to sell CDs with images back to subscribers).

I use external hard drives for my backups.
Bummer.

But Amazon.com (Jungle), Microsoft.com, Google.com, Rackspace.com, Yahoo.com (Flickr) are not the same kind of outfits.

A single web outfit is not the same as the cloud, but you are correct. When you choose the cloud you are swapping data risk (these guys will never lose your data, but you will lose some of your own data at some point) for corporate risk (they might go bust, but you never will, well you might but it won't affect your pictures).

External hard drives are cheap and a good idea. The only problem is that they are usually kept in the same location as the computer. DVD's won't last very long.

I make sure I have everything on at least one internal hard disk and an external hard disk, and a DVD too,but a fire or flood in my study would kill all of that stuff) so SOME of my pictures go onto flickr, but not the RAW files :-(

Despite my "trust the cloud" mantra, storage of large volumes of data in the cloud is still a bit expensive. It's worth it for important stuff, but I would not put up ALL my shots.

Having a copy off-site is always a good idea.
peripatetic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 14, 2008, 6:44 AM   #25
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

Something else that I've been doing from time to time is cloning drives when I upgrade them. For example, if a 200GB Drive is full, I'll move everything from it to a newer and larger drive and keep the old drive as yet another backup.

I used Linux utilities to do backups (since I run both Windows and Linux), and copy entire drives or partitions to image files (that are an exact replica of the original drives or partitions). That way, in the event of a failure, I can simply restore an image file to a new drive.

I use a command line programs for that purpose under Linux (dd or ddrescue) Here's a recent screen capture showing the use of dd (a linux utility), and ddrescue (another linux utility that works like dd, only it's faster and smarter, handling hard errors it encounters).

When doing some backups last Friday, I grabbed some screen captures (I was trying to explain how to use these utilities to someone at the time) The first screen shows me using dd to copy the first 512 bytes (the Master Boot Record) from a drive (sda) to an image file named vista_mbr20081107 on a partition located on a different drive (sdb1 in this case). I just changed directories so that I started it from sdb1 (and it will save images in your current folder if you don't specify one in our output path).

The second screen shows me using ddrescue to copy the third partion on drive sda (and that partition is referred to as sda3), to an image file named vista20081107 on a different drive (I'm copying it to sdb1, which is the first partition on a different drive). sda3 is the partition I've got Vista installed on right this minute, and I tend to back it up more often than other partitions, especially if I plan on updating it with the last service pack or security patches (since they tend to cause a lot of issues from time to time, and that gives me a way to restore a working Vista configuration since I've got a snapshot of it's partition saved to an image file that I can restore from).

I could have copied the entire drive, including the mbr and all partitions if desired, too (simply by using sda versus sda3 as the source). It just takes some getting used to how Linux handles drives (the first drive is sda, second drive is sdb, third drive is sdc, etc.). If you add a number to it, you're specifying an individual paritition (sda1 would be the first partition on the drive 1, sda2 would be the second partition, etc.).

I tend to backup individual partitions, since I tend to rearrange my hard drives fairly often (moving partitions between drives, etc.)




You can also do the same thing without using command line with something like Clonezilla (it's free). Just download the .iso file, burn it to CD and boot into it. It's got menu choices that allow you to copy a drive or partition to another drive, or to an image file.

http://clonezilla.org/

Here's a tutorial that includes clonzilla:

http://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/f..._software.html

There are some commercial products around capable of doing the same thing, allowing you to save a snapshot of an entire drive (or an individual partition) to an image file. A popular choice is Acronis True Image.

http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing...cts/trueimage/

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 14, 2008, 8:39 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
antony's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 182
Default

JimC wrote:
Quote:
I did that one time before.* The company that owned the site I used went "belly up" without any warning at all until the servers were no longer available and press releases hit about their financial problems.* ;-)
Sorry to hear that.

I personally a website, and I have one dedicated server with The Planet and one shared hosting plan with DreamHost. As being a Mac user myself, I also subscribe to Apple's MobileMe service (previously known as .Mac), mainly for syncing between Macs but since the service is there, I also use the .Mac/MobileMe for backups.

I also have a Time Capsule from Apple, although it is not the best daily backup solution available, it does the backups beautifully.

I also backup files to DVD-Rs, but I can only be bothered to do that about twice a year.
antony is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 14, 2008, 8:43 AM   #27
Administrator
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Savannah, GA (USA)
Posts: 22,378
Default

I had more than one copy. I was just pointing out that you may not want to trust a host for storage if you need to rely on it as your only backup (since there is no guarantee that they won't have financial problems and shut down).

A lot of photographers were upset at photopoint.com when they did that (since there was no warning at all until users found out that the servers their images were on were no longer available).

JimC is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 4:24 AM.