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Old Dec 18, 2008, 2:21 PM   #1
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After taking a vacation and mistakenly taking a number of pictures in "postcard" mode in my Canon SD750, I started to wonder if there is any noticeable difference in picture quality between fine and superfine. I know the picture size is much smaller, but can I actually notice a difference in the picture quality on my computer desktop between those 2 modes?

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Old Dec 18, 2008, 8:22 PM   #2
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Phillies wrote:
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After taking a vacation and mistakenly taking a number of pictures in "postcard" mode in my Canon SD750, I started to wonder if there is any noticeable difference in picture quality between fine and superfine. I know the picture size is much smaller, but can I actually notice a difference in the picture quality on my computer desktop between those 2 modes?

Thanks,
If you're just talking about displaying the images as wallpaper, I doubt it. You would likely have to view the Fine and Superfine versions at perhaps several hundred percent size to see any difference.

Likewise, if you printed the two, you probably wouldn't notice any difference until you started getting into substantial enlargement. (Don't pin me down as to the exact value of "substantial".)

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Old Dec 18, 2008, 8:39 PM   #3
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Thanks for the info!
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Old Dec 24, 2008, 3:50 PM   #4
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Best to set your camera to the highest quality.

If you decide to "crop" your photos, you'll still have plenty of megapixels to work with.

Consider buying a nice big 4gb or 8gb SD card and you won't have to worry about filling your memory card after a weekend's worth of photography.

Someday you might want to show those photos to your family or whoever, and if you copy them to disc or make a slideshow out of them, you could display them on your TV.

So having the best quality to work with is a smart starting place - you'll never know how you'll want to use those photos in the future.
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Old Dec 24, 2008, 7:03 PM   #5
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Cropping is likely to be the reason you will someday regret having your camera set at anything but the highest quality settings. Do some tests: shoot something that occupies only about a fifth or so of the linear dimension in various quality settings. If you can't see the difference when you crop, try again with the subject taking an even smaller part of the image.

Sooner or later you will take a shot at the limit of your camera no matter how many pixels you have or how good a lens you have. Do some experimenting to find out what those limits are.

Memory is cheap: get lots of it.
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