Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Dec 18, 2008, 9:06 PM   #1
Member
 
joshwhite's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 55
Default

I have about $1,000.00 that I am setting aside to get some new equipment and I am trying to be smart about what I purchase next. Just curious if anyone has some suggestions as to what move I should make next. My current setup is a Canon 20D body with these lenses.
Canon 100-300mm f4.5-5.6
Canon 24-85mm
Canon 50mm f1.8
joshwhite is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Dec 19, 2008, 2:13 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Calicajun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Quartz Hill, CA
Posts: 3,455
Default

How about the Canon 10-22mm wide angle lens, seems to be the only end you don't have covered. That lens is on my next to buy list.
Calicajun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 19, 2008, 4:14 AM   #3
Super Moderator
 
Mark1616's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 7,397
Default

It will really depend what you want to shoot that you can't currently do well due to kit limitations. So something I might choose might not be good for you and vise versa. One area that might be worth looking at is an external flash as for both indoor and outside shots this can give you a real lift in quality. People don't use flash enough in outdoor portrait shots and they are losing out as the sky is generally over exposed when getting the subject correct.

So that is one option to seriously consider, but as I say think about what you want to be able to do, where you want to take your photography next. There is little point in just buying a lens because you don't have an area covered currently.

My photography is diverse so I have the following lenses,

Sigma 12-24mm, Sigma 24-70mm f2.8, Canon 24-105mm f4 IS L, Canon 70-200mm f2.8 IS L, Sigma 120-300mm f2.8, Canon 50mm f1.8 and Canon 85mm f1.8.

Now guess how many of these areused for 95% of my photography currently???

Only 2, the 24-105is my walk around lens (on a 5D usually) and then the 70-200isused at weddings, events on a 2nd body (usuallythe 1D mkIII).So out of the2 probably 85% of shots are done with the 24-105mm. Why is this? It is a top quality piece of glass covering a good range and giving super sharp results.

The 120-300mm f2.8 has had a fair bit of use but in the past6 months I've not shot much sport which is why this isn't seeing the light of day.

Anyway, my reason for showing you this is to point out thatthere is no point inspending your heardearned money if you are not going to make use of the lenses or other equipment you buy.

Mark
Mark1616 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 19, 2008, 9:46 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
BillDrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hay River Township, WI
Posts: 2,512
Default

I agree completely with Mark: "It will really depend what you want to shoot that you can't currently do well due to kit limitations." Just about every question in photography can be answered starting with "It depends on what you are trying to do."

A good high power flash that allows lots of bounce and diffusion is one possible addition to your kit. Another is a tripod - and then you should think about studio (or at least limited hiking) vs long hikes.

What sort of bag(s) do you have to hold your stuff safely? What conditions do you use your camera in? What lens(es) do you always want with you? What kind of traveling do you do - does the bag have to fit carry on restrictions? Does the bag/case have to protect the camera/lens/flash/... in case your canoe goes over in a nasty set of rapids?

What editing software are you using? Is it painful to use because your computer is slow?
BillDrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 19, 2008, 8:38 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
VTphotog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Extreme Northeastern Vermont, USA
Posts: 4,214
Default

I'm with Bill Drew on this- you should evaluate your needs first. Your lens selection covers most situations - do you have a need for very wide angle for indoor shots, or possibly longer telephoto for wildlife? An external flash is something that will get a lot of use other than for landscapes and long-range wildlife. Most photographers I have known have at least one tripod - useful not only for camera, but will hold a slave flash or reflector as well.

Photography is about more than gear, though, and one way to get a leg up is to take a course. This can be a much better investment in the long run than a new lens.

brian
VTphotog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 24, 2008, 9:34 AM   #6
Junior Member
 
Abs.Abando's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 16
Default

VTphotog wrote:
Quote:
I'm with Bill Drew on this- you should evaluate your needs first. Your lens selection covers most situations - do you have a need for very wide angle for indoor shots, or possibly longer telephoto for wildlife? An external flash is something that will get a lot of use other than for landscapes and long-range wildlife. Most photographers I have known have at least one tripod - useful not only for camera, but will hold a slave flash or reflector as well.

Photography is about more than gear, though, and one way to get a leg up is to take a course. This can be a much better investment in the long run than a new lens.

brian
So true. I've seen a lot tyros who spend thousands on equipment without even bothering to get the proper training. What happens is that they eventually learn that they've spent too much on stuff they never needed.

Try not to find out the "hard way".
Abs.Abando is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:17 PM.