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Old Apr 12, 2009, 5:47 PM   #1
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Folks, I am in the market for a polarizing filter. This will be used offshore saltwater fishing. I looked around and I am overwhelmed by the selection that ranges from $20 to $200. What do I need? If it matters, I have a Sony A200 with the basic lens that comes with the kit.
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Old Apr 12, 2009, 6:30 PM   #2
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First, make sure you are getting a circular polarizer. The linear polarizers don't work as well with the DSLR autofocus systems. (at least that is what everyone says - I haven't tried using a linear polarizer with mine, so can't say from actual experience)

Second, you pay for what you get. I would stay away from the bargain basement filters. The optical perfomance may not be up to par. The really expensive ones have super-duper anti-scratch hard surfaces combined with very rigid quality control. If you don't anticipate using it in a windy desert, you may not need to go that far.

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Old Apr 12, 2009, 7:12 PM   #3
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I have done a little bit of research. Overall the Hoya filters appear to be very good (Hoya is known for their glass and is the glass supplier to many optical lens manufractures). About a year ago I was looking for a polarizing filter for my newly acquired 12-24 wide angle lens. Given that it was wide angle, I did not want to add anything that was going to contribute to the vignetting. I found a Nikon polarizing filter that was exetremely thin, specifically designed just for this purpose. The Nikon ran me about $150 - which is fairly expensive (it was also a very large diameter lens - 77mm which drives up the cost), I could have gone much cheaper, but for this lens it was worth it and has worked out very well. And like VTphotog indicated make sure its a circular polarizing filter.

So to some degree it depends on the lens(es) this is targeted for. For a kit lens say at 18mm (at the wide end) I would think that a good brand would do just fine, with out regard to any specific attribute. I purchsed a run of the mill set for my kit lenses 4 years ago, that have turned out well. They are Tiffin.

Here are some links that may be of interest...

http://www.google.com/search?q=polar...ient=firefox-a

One of the kit lenses for the Sony A200 is the 18-70 f/3.5-5.6 lens. This uses a 55mm filter. I see that B&H has them from Tiffin for $20, which appears to be the one I picked up 4 years ago.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...ing_Glass.html

Hope that helps...


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Old Apr 12, 2009, 8:54 PM   #4
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I've used both circular and linear polarizers with a dSLR (the linear ones date back to my film days). I found that the linear polarizers often, but not always, with dSLR cameras. It will sometimes interfere with getting a focus lock, but not always - it did it enough that I wouldn't buy one or count on mine if I needed to count on the pictures. And it would occasionally fool the light meter on the camera also.

I had a cheap 55mm circular polarizer and didn't think it worked all that well. I've had other cheap filters that added flare and ghosting under certain conditions. My circular polarizer is a B+W 77 mm filter - that's the size of my largest lens thread. Then I bought a couple of step-up rings so I can use it on other lenses I have that have smaller diameters - you can step up without getting vignetting but not step down. My recommendation is also to skip the cheap filters and start looking at the better ones.
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Old Apr 12, 2009, 9:41 PM   #5
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I saw one on B&H that was a circular filter with a warming filter. would this be good in an offshore environment?
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Old Apr 12, 2009, 10:36 PM   #6
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With digital, the warming filter really isn't going to much for you unless you shoot with fixed WB, as the camera will compensate for the color cast if you use auto WB. You can always add a warming filter when post-processing.

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Old Feb 26, 2013, 12:32 AM   #7
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hey!I am a newbie here. I am using EFS18-135mm zoom 67mm mount on Canon T3i. iam not sure if i can put Nikon 67mm C-Polarizing Filter II on it? do i need a adapter? thanks
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Old Feb 26, 2013, 5:56 AM   #8
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Canon's 67mm is the same size as Nikon's 67mm.

It's possible that a Polarizing Filter could cause vignetting at short focal lengths/wide angles of view, but that's got nothing to do with the lens being from Canon and the filter being fron Nikon.
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Old Feb 26, 2013, 2:48 PM   #9
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G'day all

Quote:
Originally Posted by interested_observer View Post
.... Overall the Hoya filters appear to be very good (Hoya is known for their glass and is the glass supplier to many optical lens manufractures). ......... Hope that helps...
I would generally agree with you here too BUT
I recently updated my CPL with another Hoya - 67mm cost me $99 and it does not work one iota

I cannot under any circumstances get the blue sky to darken, and shop window reflections barely "soften" either

Problem for me is that since buying it, we've had so much rain & cloudy days that I haven't had a good day to go back to the shop and show it to them - a real bugga

Regards, Phil
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