Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Oct 30, 2003, 7:50 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Joshua B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 596
Default Night-time photography help needed

How can I prevent light from being overexposed in my night shots?

Check out this shot. The clock and moon are overexposed.

Shot tonight in raw mode, on a tripod, with no flash. I tried many different exposure and metering settings but the lights are always overexposed.



Camera Model: Canon PowerShot G5
Shutter speed: 13 sec
Aperture: 7.1
Exposure mode: Tv
Exposure compensation: -1
Flash: Off
Metering mode: Evaluative
Drive mode: Single frame shooting
ISO: 50
AF mode: Single AF
Image size: 2592 x 1944
Image quality: Lossless
White balance: Auto
Saturation: Normal
Sharpness: Normal
Contrast: Normal
Picture Effect: Normal
Joshua B is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Oct 30, 2003, 8:42 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
sjms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 2,735
Default

get familiar with PS and learn to composite. shoot a shot spot metered for the clock then the moon and then the overall image. then work them in PS to put the clock face into the overall. you'l have to tame the blooming in the overall shot. and the moon again the same. thats 3 different images without moving.
sjms is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 30, 2003, 8:57 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Joshua B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 596
Default

Ah, so it's called blooming. I'm familiar with Photoshop, but I haven't really tried spot metering. Thanks for the tips. I'm going to try spot metering soon.
Joshua B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 30, 2003, 10:41 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
BillDrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hay River Township, WI
Posts: 2,512
Default

I am sure the spot meter in your (or any camera) covers a small enough angle to meter the moon, and doubt you can cover the clock. so the choice comes down to bracketing - more than three exposures.

As a first guess for the moon, keep in mind that you are shooting a photo of a rock in bright sunlight. That means the old "sunny f/16" rule is a good starting point for exposure. The "sunny f/16" rule says the exposure in bright sunlight is f/16 with a shutter speed equal to 1/ISO, or 1/100 at ISO=100, or f/11 at 1/200, or f/8 at 1/400, ...
BillDrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 30, 2003, 10:56 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 1,910
Default

Check out this page on how to do it by taking two pictures and blending them:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...blending.shtml

You can get the long exposure of everything else, and a short exposure for the lights and clock, and then blend them.
Mike_PEAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 4, 2003, 7:31 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Joshua B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 596
Default

Thanks Mike, Bill, and sjms! I stopped at the church on the way home from work tonight and tried out the technique.

Joshua B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 4, 2003, 7:50 PM   #7
djb
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Posts: 2,289
Default

excellent!!!!!!

dennis
djb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 4, 2003, 8:11 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Joshua B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 596
Default

Thanks! I just did it again with a better exposed clock photo.

Joshua B is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:36 AM.