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Old Nov 6, 2003, 4:39 AM   #1
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Default Image quality - Which is the best 5MP or more camera

Question is simple

Which are the camera(s) (5MP or more) that gives crisp and non grainy pcitures consistently?

Does canon camera's produce less grainy pictures compared nikkon and sony models. ( i have noticed grainy skies in lots of pictures from sony and nikkon cameras on this site)

i wud like the discussion in this thread to be limited to image quality alone. not on things like value for money/memory format/battery etc.
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Old Nov 6, 2003, 10:18 AM   #2
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Crisp images are a combination of a sharp lens, good processing and using a tripod. The image stabilization on the Minolta A1 will probably give the most consistently crisp hand held shots with the image stabilization. It has a sharp lens and they seem to have a good balance with the in-camera processing. I find that raw mode gives superior shots, and Minolta has improved their raw coding so that the files are only 5Mp compared to 9.5 on the D7x series. They also have 14 bit A/D conversion and a superfine JPG mode. Noise isnít the very best but it is quite good.

I have one of the noisiest early 5Mp cameras and it isnít usually a big problem. If you view the images at 100% and scroll around the noise is quite obvious. But according to your monitor size and resolution that can represent an enormous blowup. Viewed at screen size or even printed at 13 X 19 the noise isnít usually obnoxious. Compared to the grain from my film scanner is isnít bad Ė especially for shots taken with 400ASA film. Neat Image or an equivalent grain and noise remover is necessary for the film scanner and will clean up a digital shot beautifully if I want to print a large blowup without noise. Of the new 5Mp cameras I think only the Fuji S7000 has really obnoxious noise levels. Neat Image would clean them up but it is more hassle than I would like for all of my shots.

If you really want low noise get a DLSR. You have much better dynamic range and less noise. You can see the difference at a glance without having to go to 100%.
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Old Nov 6, 2003, 10:50 AM   #3
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It also depends what you're lookiong for in a camera, i.e. more point-and-shoot or more advanced controls. My Kodak dx4530 gives beautiful, sharp pictures, but is limited in manual controls...
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Old Nov 6, 2003, 11:17 AM   #4
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Thanks for the responses....

I currently own a A40, which i bought after comparing the sample pics
from steves-digicams with the ones shot by other similar cameras.

If you have alook at the following pic, the canon G5 seems to take pics with
lesser noise than the nikon and sony counterpart.
especially in the shadows and blue sky.

Canon G5
-------------------
http://www.steves-digicams.com/2003_...s/IMG_0230.JPG

Nikon 5400
-------------------
http://www.steves-digicams.com/2003_...s/DSCN9253.JPG

Sony F717
-------------------
http://www.steves-digicams.com/2002_...s/dsc00048.jpg

=================================


Is it beacuse canon G5 takes better pictures?? or something else?

I am interested going for wither G5, sony F828 or Nikon 5700.
which one will be the best based on image quality.
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Old Nov 6, 2003, 11:31 AM   #5
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Actually, according to the noise tests at dpreview.com, the G5 noise levels are higher than the competition.

Phil said this in his conclusion:

"The G5 suffers from higher noise than the G3, and notably higher than the competition, it also has a chromatic aberration problem which is more than I would expect to see on a modern digital camera."

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canong5/page17.asp

You may want to read the reviews of cameras you are considering at http://www.dpreview.com

Phil Askey (owner/editor) tests noise in controlled conditions.
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Old Nov 6, 2003, 11:43 AM   #6
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P.S. -- a hint

If you look at the noise tests of cameras using the 2/3" Sony CCD (for example: Sony DSC-F717, Minolta DiMAGE D7HI, Nikon Coolpix 5700), the Sony has the least noise.

If you look at the noise tests of cameras using the smaller, denser 1/1.8" Sony 5 Megapixel CCD (for example: Sony DSC-V1, Nikon 5400, Canon G5), the Sony has the least noise.

See the noise tests in the reviews at http://www.dpreview.com
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Old Nov 6, 2003, 11:51 AM   #7
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I have the 5700 and am very pleased with the results.
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Old Nov 6, 2003, 12:15 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gibsonpd3620
I have the 5700 and am very pleased with the results.
At ISO 100, the Nikon CP 5700 actually has lower noise than the Sony DSC-F717.

At higher ISO speeds, the Sony keeps noise more under control.

Noise is always more prominent at higher ISO speeds, in underexposed areas of a photo.

So, if your photos are going to be taken in good light, at lower ISO Speeds, then most digital cameras are going to have low enough noise levels to satisfy most users.

However, if you plan on taking photos in lower light conditions, then noise can become more of a problem.

If it's that much of a concern, then consider a dSLR (like the Canon EOS-300D, or EOS-10D). These cameras can shoot at much higher ISO speeds with lower noise, compared to consumer cameras with much small sensors.

Again, I'd read the reviews at dpreview.com for cameras you are considering, since Phil tests noise (at different ISO speeds) in his camera's reviews.

Here is one of the pages from his Sony DSC-F717 review. Note that at ISO 100, the Nikon actually had lower noise:

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/sonydscf717/page13.asp
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