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Old Nov 6, 2003, 10:23 AM   #1
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Default DigiCam as Web Cam?

I love my optio S but have been unable to figure out if it can be used as a web cam. CAn it? Or are there any digital cameras that can serve the dual purpose?
Thanks!
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Old Nov 6, 2003, 9:52 PM   #2
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It's not worth it....digicams use CCDs which heat up over time and get hot pixels. With a lot of use those pixels can become stuck ruining your pictures. Do you want to throw away your good camera like that, or just buy a cheap dedicated webcam?

There are some Creative brand cameras that are dual purpose, but they are lousy digital cameras!
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Old Nov 7, 2003, 1:12 AM   #3
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I've know that there are some that are, but I'm almost sure that would be touted as a feature. If you don't know if yours is, it probably isn't...!
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Old Nov 10, 2003, 3:40 AM   #4
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[quote="Mike_PEAT"]It's not worth it....digicams use CCDs which heat up over time and get hot pixels. With a lot of use those pixels can become stuck ruining your pictures. Do you want to throw away your good camera like that, or just buy a cheap dedicated webcam?

I can see your point if we wanted to broadcast live video 24/7 365 days a year, but most of us who use webcams only use it from time to time, a couple hours at a time at most so I really doubt that it would damage the camera in anyway, especially since the LCD is not even used when in webcam mode..

But here is the question of the day:

I just got a new Kodak CX6230 and it works perfectly as a webcam when it's plugged into my ATI All in Wonder card, the only problem is (big problem) that I cannot find a way so far to disable the auto power saver thingy which shuts the screen off after 60 seconds even if the camera is plugged into the AC Adaptor...

Any help would really be appreciate.. Please Email me.
I used to have an old Kodak DC220 and it had the same problem, but that camera used something called "script" and I found one which after installed, it had the option to disable the power saver feature which shuts off the LCD or "Video Out" which used to work so well for Webcam purposes.
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Old Nov 10, 2003, 4:17 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike_PEAT
It's not worth it....digicams use CCDs which heat up over time and get hot pixels. With a lot of use those pixels can become stuck ruining your pictures. Do you want to throw away your good camera like that, or just buy a cheap dedicated webcam?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrjunky
I can see your point if we wanted to broadcast live video 24/7 365 days a year, but most of us who use webcams only use it from time to time, a couple hours at a time at most so I really doubt that it would damage the camera in anyway, especially since the LCD is not even used when in webcam mode..
I never mentioned the LCD...I'm talking about the CCD, the component that actually captures the light. I do notice that even after a short time at long exposures more and more hot pixels develop. It's your choice...I know I'm not going to waste/ruin my $1000 camera on a job a $20 webcam can do.
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Old Nov 10, 2003, 4:00 PM   #6
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Thanks for the advice about the CCD, though in a digital camera it's the LCD which causes the most heat and power consumption.

Also there are many digital cameras, most all of the Fuji line, many in the Polaroid line, some Minolta too which advertise that these cameras are dual function. Digicam and Webcam. There are many others besides the brands I mention which are dual mode too like
Sipix, Argus, Concord etc, many if not all of these also are dual mode digicams.

I have tested many of these I mentioned above in Webcam mode but all of these which I have mentioned are way way too dark
to use as a webcam unless people want to have flood lights pointing in their faces. All of these types have ISO of only 100 so I guess this is the main reason why they need LOT'S of light if used as a Webcam or using these types without flash indoors at night with average/ambient room light.

But their are a lot of digicams which have ISO options ranging from 100 to 400 and some even more. My Kodak CX6230 is rated at 100/200 ISO so I guess that's the reason why when I use it as a webcam or digicam even at night with normal room lighting it still looks great and it has more than enough brightness.

My only problem like most everyone else is simply that digicams which have A/V output and are not advertised as dual mode cameras all have a power saver - time-out built in feature which after 60sec. 2-3 minutes they all shut down the CCD..
I am trying to find someone who knows a lot about these things to maybe let me know if there is any way at all to overcome this problem.

Thanks for the reply.
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Old Nov 10, 2003, 5:04 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrjunky
Thanks for the advice about the CCD, though in a digital camera it's the LCD which causes the most heat and power consumption.
Well, here's a picture of a CCD installed in a camera...notice the large heat sink attached to the CCD http://www.pbase.com/image/19796905

It's needed to disappate heat from the CCD because it does generate heat which affects the quality of the capture. Although lower MP cameras don't suffer as much, you will find with higher MP cameras will suffer more.
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Old Nov 10, 2003, 5:46 PM   #8
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Just checked out that link of a picture of the CCD on a circuit board.
It is an excellent example for sure.

I am not saying that the metal mount which the CCD is attached and soldered to is not a heat sink, but usually heat sinks have some sort of fin's, or a lot of holes in them to disapate heat more readily.

But the picture I saw with the flat thick metal mount could have just as easily been for the purpose of alignment, in other words to have the exact positioning of the CCD lens as it is installed into the camera. I am sure even if the CCD is even off by a few degrees left/right/up/down or if the angle of it is not exactly right the picture you see in LCD and or viewfinder would not be what you would actually get when taking pictures.

Those 4 holes in metal CCD mount might be there mainly for
alignment purposes??? I have seen many heat sinks and all of them have either lot's of holes, or fins or something which disapates heat as fast as possible. (I could be wrong) :P
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