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Old Nov 7, 2003, 10:46 AM   #1
kex
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Default How to get a step further?

Hi.
ATM, I own a Canon A60 and a Fuji A2650.
I bought the Fuji last christmas and began photographing.
I got -and I still am- very ambitious. That's why I bought the A60 this summer. It provides more features and stuff like that and was about the price I paid for the Fuji last christmas.
Actually it was a deal with my father, who said he could need a digital camera for work to take photos of lacks at the building lots he works at as construction supervisor.
Well actually, I didn't have to pay for the new cam. That's why I made the deal.

But, of course "digicam-mania" is still developing for me, and I'd love to have a real good digicam some day.
But as a student, I don't have the money to just buy a new cam.

That's why I'd like to ask you, how some of you managed to become an amateur or even pro with his own "big" cam.

I guess not everybody of you just went to his bank, got the money and bought the new cam.
As I said before, the ardor towards digital photograhpy is a kind of developement, at least to me, and you always want to develope and become better and better, but that ain't easy with a 2MP, 3xzoom cam with limited abilities, or am I wrong?
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Old Nov 7, 2003, 11:14 AM   #2
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I'm now on my 7th Digital Camera, and there are pros and cons to all of them.

I've owned the Nikon Coolpix 950 (which I still have), Olympus C-2500L, Sony DSC-F505, Nikon Coolpix 990, Epson PhotoPC 3000z, Sony DSC-P10 (which I quickly returned -- I was unhappy with it), and my most recent purchase: a Konia Revio KD-510z (a.k.a., Minolta DiMAGE G500).

I also own multiple 35mm Cameras, including a nice Nikon N4004s SLR, which I still use (despite it's age, it still works great).

There is no perfect camera. Period. The best way to develop your skills, is to become as familiar as possible with your tools (cameras). Then, learn to work around their limitations, and take advantage of their strengths.

BTW, your two existing cameras are very similiar (both 2MP, although the Canon has more features). I'm curious -- does the Fuji take better photos in most conditions at full auto?

I have a friend with a Fuji 2600, and I've been very impressed with the quality of the photos from it.
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Old Nov 7, 2003, 11:19 AM   #3
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hi. and thanks for your reply.
You're right, every cam has its advantages and disadvantages...

Concerning the zoom comparison of my both cams: I really don't know. :roll:
But I think it's worth comparing both under same conditions!
I'll take some sample pics with a tripod tomorrow, when I come back.

But thanks again for your comment!
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Old Nov 7, 2003, 12:02 PM   #4
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Well, my first statement isn't going to help you much. I just went to the bank. I work my butt off at my job, I do it well, and they pay me well to do it. I live very frugally and save money. So when I know I want to do something, I have the money saved to do it (of course, I research it to death... but that is probably obvious to everyone here by now! ) It doesn’t hurt that I believe social security won’t exist by the time I get to the age to use it. It’s a good motivational tool to get me to save.

But to get to your real question…. I’m not sure I understand what you are asking. Is it about hardware (how do people afford to get the “big” cameras, as you put it) or how to people become better photographers within the confines of what they have? Those are very different question.

Eric

ps. I enjoy your work in the galleries, so don't for a minute think you're not a good photographer. Both in how you take the picture and what you choose to take.
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Old Nov 7, 2003, 12:13 PM   #5
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hi eric.
thanks for your reply.
My question actually is something in between.
People, (I) want to improve. But some day those compact cams as I have them are at its limit and you need to get a better one.
At the moment, I'm still a student, and it's hard to save as much money as I could need for a real good cam.

I hoped to get an answer on how to (maybe) gather money by taking photos. But it's not easy taking high quality photos with such a cam.
So it's a kind of vicious circle.

Mhm. maybe my question is a little confusing, but your replies already helped!
I just want to read other people's experiences on their developement in digital photography, not just on the financial part, but also on their overall situation and progress.

And thanks eric for your kind comment on my galleries. That's really motivating!
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Old Nov 7, 2003, 4:13 PM   #6
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You might want to think about getting a film camera, the second hand price of those has come down - way down - since digital has taken off. Since the cost of owning a film camera is in the film and processing, don't take very many pictures with it. Just shoot the ones that you think you might be able to sell.

Keep in mind that Ansell Adams rarely shot more than 2 images/day. Not the technique most photographers use, but a good one to learn something about. And it is cheap.
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Old Nov 7, 2003, 4:55 PM   #7
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Being a student can leave a person in a constant state of "poverty," but if you're determined to get a bigger, better camera, it first requires denying yourself other things and having patience. My son, a seemingly perennial student, will sell possessions, take on small jobs, and generally pinch pennies until he has enough to buy what he wants. Needless to say, he also periodically charms his parents out of money.

Think about your various skills, not just in photography, and then see if you can figure out a way to make a little extra money from them. And don't get a girlfriend. They're expensive.
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Old Nov 7, 2003, 5:20 PM   #8
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kex

The problem with all of us is money. You have some skills that can be put to use. Teach basic digicam photography to friends and family. Electronic gadgets are frighting to alot of people. Break you class into three sessions
1. Taking photos
2. Editing photos
3. Printing, web posting and emailing photos.

Charge a modest fee say $25 per session and make the session last at least two hours. Try to gather more than one student per session. Three students are about my maximum to work with. I plan for two hour classes and they usually run 2 and half to 3 hours.

The majority of people only want to take pictures, print them and or email them to friends and family.

Your students will be your best form of advertisement. Treat them well. My favorite students are people that are over 65. I love to see people who are willing to try new things regardless of their age. My mother in law is 83 and surfs the web and emails her grandchildren and great grandchildren.

You have knowledge -- let it work for you.

Phil
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Old Nov 7, 2003, 6:22 PM   #9
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Question 1: How to improve beyond the limits of the cameras you have

I wondered about a film camera as well. If you choose one that has compatable lenses with some digital SLRs you might like, you'd be building up some lenses that you could reuse. Not a bad thing. Of course, you could still use the digital ones as well, so if you felt the desire to take loads of pictures, you can mix them both.

Question 2: How to make some money with a camera.

That is not an easy question. gibsonpd3620's idea isn't a bad one. I'm really not sure. If your school has a paper, you might be able to take some pictures for them. They (probably) won't pay, but it will stretch your skills in other directions.

There is a thread about someone trying to make some money with their camera which has been fairly active. I just posted to it today, so I know is up here the top...

http://www.stevesforums.com/phpBB2/v...ic.php?t=15987

Eric
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Old Nov 8, 2003, 7:02 AM   #10
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first of all: thank you very much for your replies!

Quote:
You might want to think about getting a film camera, the second hand price of those has come down
I thought about that before. but as you said the film and processing are quite expensive to me if I keep on taking photos like I do with my digicam.
But then again, of course I could just shoot the ones I think are good.
But how do I know, they're good, before I can see them on the lcd a normal cam doesn't have?
But okay, it's a matter of practise and worth to think about, so thank you very much! (seriously)

Quote:
Being a student can leave a person in a constant state of "poverty," but if you're determined to get a bigger, better camera, it first requires denying yourself other things and having patience.
Mhmmmm. I know, but it's very hard for me to deny myself to other things like going out at the weekends, which isn't cheap as well. But I guess patience is a thing I have, so I'll just have to wait some time. Who knows what comes next?

Quote:
take on small jobs
Well I got one little job. I carry out a weekly newspaper and get about $20 a month for that.
But atm I can't take other jobs, because I'm doing my university-entrance diploma in spring. :-S
But then again I got a year for civilian service where I get some money.
So hopefully the "money problem" will change next year.

Quote:
And don't get a girlfriend. They're expensive.
Oh yesss, I think so, too. Fortunately I don't have a girlfriend, although it has its good parts too, having one.

Quote:
Teach basic digicam photography to friends and family. Electronic gadgets are frighting to alot of people. Break you class into three sessions
Well, that's a really good idea! But I can't imagine who could be interested in that right now. My friends and kith aren't really interested in photography, plus I don't really know if I already could give lessons. Remember that I've just started photography last year, so I'm not really that experienced. I wouldn't overrate myself.

Quote:
If you choose one that has compatable lenses with some digital SLRs you might like, you'd be building up some lenses that you could reuse.
Aren't those lenses very expensive, too? I'm asking because I just know some prices for the digital cameras, and I can't imagine, there are big differences in the price.

Quote:
There is a thread about someone trying to make some money with their camera which has been fairly active. I just posted to it today, so I know is up here the top...

http://www.stevesforums.com/phpBB2/v...ic.php?t=15987
Thanks! That's an interesting topic. I'll read it more exactly this afternoon. I really appreciate every tip you all gave/give me.
It really helps!
So thank's again for reading and answering my questions.
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