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Old Aug 25, 2009, 9:47 PM   #1
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Default What the heck are these lints in my photo?

I recently noticed these lints in my photos and they move depending on what optical zoom position I'm using. If I use digital zoom and zoom way in, it disappears.

I cleaned the front element to no avail.

I took it apart.. result camera got totalled. Not that it matters, because I was going to toss it, because this is not an acceptable outcome.

How did this happen though?



It's a Casio EX-Z700
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Old Aug 26, 2009, 5:37 AM   #2
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Since they move with changes in the optical zoom, I suspect they are on the inside of the lens, most likely on the back of the rearmost lens element.

This can happen sometimes with zoom lenses. As you zoom, the optical elements within the lens move around, causing air to be sucked into the lens assembly, bringing dust along with it. Lenses on P&S digicams are usually sealed against this kind of thing, keeping out the big chunks, but on an older camera, it's possible that the seals have broken down with age, or have become damaged in some way.
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Old Aug 26, 2009, 2:50 PM   #3
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Since they move with changes in the optical zoom, I suspect they are on the inside of the lens, most likely on the back of the rearmost lens element.

This can happen sometimes with zoom lenses. As you zoom, the optical elements within the lens move around, causing air to be sucked into the lens assembly, bringing dust along with it. Lenses on P&S digicams are usually sealed against this kind of thing, keeping out the big chunks, but on an older camera, it's possible that the seals have broken down with age, or have become damaged in some way.

It was almost exactly two years old. Dammit. I'm parting out and selling on eBay.
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Old Aug 26, 2009, 9:02 PM   #4
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I have disassembled some older lenses for cleaning and found that some of the seals used are felt, which can itself, break down and leave particles and threads behind.
A really tight seal would create enough friction to make it difficult for the small zoom motors in digicams to move the lens, so there is a bit of compromise involved.

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Old Aug 28, 2009, 9:45 PM   #5
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You have dirt inside your lens. I have the same problem with my P&S camera from carrying it around in my pockets.
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Old Aug 29, 2009, 6:23 PM   #6
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I took it apart and I totalled it in the process. Go figure.
Are those non-extending lens cameras more resistant to this?

I'm looking at the Fuji Z33WP, but I don't really like the user interface. I loved the user interface on my Exilim.

Last edited by itsme000; Aug 29, 2009 at 6:25 PM.
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Old Aug 29, 2009, 11:25 PM   #7
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Non-extending lens cameras will be more resistant to sucking in dust and lint. Now you're giving me second thoughts about taking apart my Fuji to get at the dust behind my front lens element. I can see it and it's bugging me. How did you totaled your Casio?
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Old Aug 30, 2009, 6:54 PM   #8
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Non-extending lens cameras will be more resistant to sucking in dust and lint. Now you're giving me second thoughts about taking apart my Fuji to get at the dust behind my front lens element. I can see it and it's bugging me. How did you totaled your Casio?
The internal workings are very small with delicate ribbons, etc. I couldn't get it back together right and I lost a spring. It's 10x harder for you to do it than an authorized service tech, because he's got a factory service manual, plus a bin of spare parts that might go flying across, like a spring.

I would sell your camera as-is, then use the money to buy a new one.
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Old Sep 24, 2009, 10:57 AM   #9
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just tried taking one of these apart myself. I'm surprised - it's quite tidy inside compared to another slimmer exilim I took apart previously.

It's like a little operation. You've got to be so delicate, remembering where everything goes.

I have the same issue.

The motorised zoom lens unit, seems to be a one section affair.

I removed the front and back casing - 5 screws for the front, same for the back. Then remove the grey plastic battery slot at the bottom (that was after getting the pin out of the hinge to access another screw). The two side metal bits to which the case screws to, also seem willing to come off without much resistance (though when putting them back you have to be careful not to clip one of the wires close to the side)

The lens mechanism seemed to be clipped onto the board on first glances, and whilst that is the case, I think it's also screwed it. This means going round the back again and removing the LCD - but before you can do that - you have to detach the little control panel from its connector - to access - you lift up the panel which is attached with some adhesive tape.

I was about to go ahead with that, but it's not my camera - and that's where things start getting risky. So have put it back together for the moment.

itsme - did you follow the same procedure as me, or did you just try and yank off the motorised lens unit?

Last edited by volatileacid; Sep 24, 2009 at 10:59 AM.
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Old Sep 24, 2009, 11:47 AM   #10
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In my opinion this should never happen to a point and shoot camera. With my DSLR, I expect this sort of problem, have been warned about this problem, and routinely clean the sensor. For all practical purposes an impossible job with a P&S camera.

While you wont get your money back, I would complain to the manufacturer. I have a P&S that is nine years old, and does not have this problem. It shouldn't be rocket science to have a sealed sensor. Two years old, and showing hairs on the sensor? Rediculous.

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