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Old Sep 1, 2009, 8:19 AM   #11
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Looked at NASA's web site, couldn't find any, they say they have thousands of objects up there...
Yes, but with a 50mm lens, you'd only be able to see the Shuttle or the Space Station.
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Old Sep 1, 2009, 8:55 AM   #12
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Yes, but with a 50mm lens, you'd only be able to see the Shuttle or the Space Station.
You are correct, using this site: http://www.n2yo.com/?s=35811 I figured out that it was the Shuttle.

You can't check past time, but because I will have another chance seeing it on Sept. 5th I can assume it was the shuttle.

Thanks.
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Old Sep 1, 2009, 9:18 PM   #13
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Brian- I also thought so when I first saw it, but it is moving in a straight line.
Did you actually see the object while you were shooting the pictures, or only notice it while you were looking at the results?

As you say, you were changing lenses, and your camera orientation could have changed, even if on a tripod. Look at the pixel position in the frame, not just relative to other objects.

Things in Low Earth Orbit move quite fast relative to a ground observer. At 15s shutter, you would not see a point, but a streak. A weather balloon might rise slowly enough to not show motion at that shutter time, and would be more likely to seem to rise vertically.

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Old Sep 3, 2009, 7:01 PM   #14
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I believe you can also find historical data for the shuttle, ISS, and many other satellites at heavens-above.com. You can research on time and LAT/LONG. It's also a pretty cool site!
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