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Old Aug 31, 2009, 2:36 PM   #1
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Default The space station or a satellite?

While running a test to my 50mm lenses for my canon T1i, i noticed a spot in all three shoots I took.

I thought dust! Then I discussed it with my brother and we speculated that it might be the space station or a satellite? It is too high and slow for a plain and too fast for a star.

All pictures taken with different lenses, F7.1 for 15 seconds, approximately 30 seconds to replace a lens. What is it?

See the red marking in the following pictures:
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Last edited by Ilan; Aug 31, 2009 at 3:52 PM.
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Old Aug 31, 2009, 3:00 PM   #2
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Swamp gas from a weather balloon was trapped in a thermal pocket and refracted the light from Venus.
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Old Aug 31, 2009, 3:01 PM   #3
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Where were you, btw?
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Old Aug 31, 2009, 3:05 PM   #4
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And in what order were these taken?
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Old Aug 31, 2009, 3:49 PM   #5
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And in what order were these taken?
Order taken from top to bottom.

Location: Jerusalem Israel. In the picture you can see the Hebrew University tower. You can see the spot to the left of it.

Lenses: Tamron 17-50, Canon 18-55 IS and Canon 50mm F2.5 compact macro.
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Old Aug 31, 2009, 4:18 PM   #6
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You're far enough south that something in orbit around the earth would be moving almost vertically in the sky. If this is in the evening, you'd be facing west. It could be the shuttle or the space station. Nothing else is big enough to be seen without a telephoto.
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Old Aug 31, 2009, 6:17 PM   #7
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You might be able to compare your line of site and the charts at NASA to figure what, if any, spacecraft may have been transiting that portion of the sky at that time.

http://science.nasa.gov/realtime/
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Old Aug 31, 2009, 7:36 PM   #8
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And check the clock in your computer and find out how much it is off Universal time. Then look at the EXIF data to find the time it was taken - then you have what you need to check the orbit of the Space Station.
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Old Sep 1, 2009, 12:22 AM   #9
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Try repeating the exposure with your lens cap on. There doesn't appear to be sufficient motion blur for it to be any astronomical object at a 15 second exposure. My guess is a hot (or warm, anyway), pixel. Another possibility, considering the lights in the scene, is an internal reflection, though that isn't too likely, given three different lenses.

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Old Sep 1, 2009, 5:36 AM   #10
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Quote:
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And check the clock in your computer and find out how much it is off Universal time. Then look at the EXIF data to find the time it was taken - then you have what you need to check the orbit of the Space Station.
Looked at NASA's web site, couldn't find any, they say they have thousands of objects up there...

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Try repeating the exposure with your lens cap on. There doesn't appear to be sufficient motion blur for it to be any astronomical object at a 15 second exposure. My guess is a hot (or warm, anyway), pixel. Another possibility, considering the lights in the scene, is an internal reflection, though that isn't too likely, given three different lenses.

brian
Brian- I also thought so when I first saw it, but it is moving in a straight line.
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