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Old Oct 7, 2009, 8:20 PM   #11
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... I ask because there is a school of photography that attempts to evoke that amateur ethos in their work. Are they per force producing bad photographs? Or is it no longer bad if it was done for an artistic purpose, ...
That depends. Did the "art" work? Did it enhance the image? Did it increase the level of emotion the image evokes from the viewer. If it didn't, then, yeah, they just made a snapshot when they could have made a photograph.
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Old Oct 7, 2009, 10:14 PM   #12
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Peripatetic...that was very well put

As a relative new comer to photography, and I say that as I too believe that photography is different then taking pictures.

I have taken thousands of `work`pictures,,cracks in the road, potholes, etc etc...From a technical perspective..I can judge what is a good photo from what was my original goal...to show blah blah...

I look at scenery and think wow!!! I look at something 'unique' and think that's interesting...in both cases I'd like to reserve that image...but when the pic is taken I usually 'miss' it..the photo doesn't capture my original feeling.

That's my challenge. One of the difficulties is knowing when its 'me' (poor composition) or when its 'camera' (equipment limitations) or just settings.

I know that 'art' is hard to say..'its art' or that isn't art.....I've seen some pretty weird crap that people call art

In general, I want to capture the image that provoked feelings in me...I just want a good picture of that image.
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Old Oct 8, 2009, 5:52 AM   #13
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i just think its if people like it, simple as that, no one person should be able to say whats good or not.
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Old Oct 8, 2009, 12:21 PM   #14
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Chase Jarvis a well known high end commercial photographer has lately been using an iPhone to make his art images
http://www.chasejarvis.com/iphone-as...tos-pi_19.html

It is the being there, knowing what and how to shoot that helps make a shot. Not the equipment.
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Old Oct 8, 2009, 12:55 PM   #15
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It is the being there, knowing what and how to shoot that helps make a shot. Not the equipment.
While photographer skill is the single most important part, I think it's inaccurate to suggest equipment is irrelevant.

Ask any portrait photog - can they make better images with a strobbe than a built-in flash? Are the images improved again with adding an umbrella or softbox? Are the images improved even more when a 2nd light is added? And a third? Or when reflecters are used? Ask a photog if gelling the lights can improve things.

Want to take photos of an eagle's nest with babies in it from 100 yards away? Think an iphone is going to do a good job of that?

Ask a macro photographer if a 1:1 macro lens doesn't give them better reults than 4:1 for insects.

Can I create better sports images with the AF system in my camera vs. manual focus? You bet I can. Can I create better images in gymnastics with my 1dmkIII than I could with my 300D or with trying to push 800 film? Absolutely.

You can always find creative uses for a simple tool. So I agree, even with simple tools it's possible to create some great things. But, a craftsman knows using the right tool for the job enables you to do the job better.

If equipment didn't matter then photojournalists and fashion and magazine photogs would be using iphones for all their work. I'm sure they would all jump at the option to fit all their gear in a single pocket.
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Old Oct 8, 2009, 1:11 PM   #16
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I will agree that having piles of equipment helps you make images easier, sometimes permits you to make some images you could not without it.

However focusing on equipment is only part of the art for some people.

Do I have piles of equipment, yes,
lenses from 17-600mm, studio strobes and portable flashes coming out the wazoo.
Do I need them, no,
give me a slr, a 50mm and a couple of reflectors and I can be quite happy in most non-business cases.

Would I want to do a wedding or run my studio without them, no
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Old Oct 8, 2009, 3:04 PM   #17
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Wow, this is an interesting thread. Thanks for starting it Bynx.

To me a good/great photograph is one the makes me stop and look at it for more than just a quick glance. It does not have to follow all the "rules" of photography, it just has to be interesting to me. I have studied work from some of the greats some inspire me and some don't do much for me.
So it does not matter to me if it was taken with an Iphone or the latest and greatest DSLR. It's the person behind the lens and their eye to capture that moment in time in an interesting manner.
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Old Oct 8, 2009, 3:30 PM   #18
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To me, the best photographs are those that tell (show) a unique story through the ways of beauty and technical perfection.
Of course, beauty is a delicate, controversial and discussible concept.
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Old Oct 8, 2009, 5:12 PM   #19
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As with all things that require skill, one cannot begin to break the rules, until the rules are mastered. As Peripatetic has pointed out, photography, is Both a craft and an art. And just as I can wonder on my favorite beach and find art tossed up by the forces of nature, so I can accidently take a photograph, that is a work of art by accident.

Might as well ask that question that never gets a final answer - What is Art?

You know it when you see it, and a photograph that grabs your attention and makes you think, is at least somewhat of an answer. Just as my apartment is littered with "good" paintings, how many of them are great paintings?

A great photographer produces far more works of art than a mere crafts person. But someone like myself, who is Not a great photographer, might very well match the greatest on a few occasions, whereas a mediocre painter will Never produce a masterpiece.

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Old Oct 8, 2009, 7:41 PM   #20
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Can I create better sports images with the AF system in my camera vs. manual focus? You bet I can.
Try auto focus at fifty miles an hour heading right at you.

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I never had any luck at all with these kinds of shots with auto-focus, always a touch behind.

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