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Old Nov 15, 2009, 5:59 PM   #11
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It's true... technical development isn't limited to any one given area of DSLRs. But I'm with John when he says he'd prefer more of the R&D dollars going toward areas that clearly need it - namely dynamic range and high ISO performance - rather than toward more pixels, which only professionals shooting images for posters and/or billboards really need.
Well, the better the detail of the image, the more you can crop the image. For example, you could create seperate images out of one image if you were using a much higher MP count.

Oddly enough, I recently purchased a 4Meg Sigma, which as such a high resolving power that I can do the above now. But the Foveon chip is such a different kettle of fish from Bayer sensors, that technological advance will also include developing different kinds of sensors.

You can bet your bottom dollar that every aspect of digital photography is being developed.

I bought my first digital camera about 15 years ago. So, from 640x480, look how far we've come in that miniscule span of time.

I for one would NEVER have predicted what we now have.

And the only accurate prediction I can now make, is that ten years from now, we will hold in our little sweaty hands machinary that we simply didn't dream of...

There is always a tendancy to extrapolate the future of technology based on todays technology. And I would be the first to admit doing that. But progress is not necessarily liniar...

Dave
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Old Nov 15, 2009, 6:22 PM   #12
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... But progress is not necessarily liniar. ...
No. And it's not geometric either. It's exponential.
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Old Nov 15, 2009, 7:17 PM   #13
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And, ten years from now we will be arguing about which camera best compensates for quantum jitter.

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Old Nov 15, 2009, 8:29 PM   #14
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And, twenty years from now the problem of motion blur will have been solved because all cameras will have a built-in wormhole generator which freezes time within the angle of view of the camera for the duration of the exposure.
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Old Nov 16, 2009, 9:28 AM   #15
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"And, twenty years from now the problem of motion blur will have been solved because all cameras will have a built-in wormhole generator which freezes time within the angle of view of the camera for the duration of the exposure."

Priceless!!

And I wish to thank all you contributers to this thread for educating this photographic novice. It was a great read.

Almar....76 and counting. (That's my age, not the number of posts I've made.....only just noticed that!)

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Old Nov 16, 2009, 11:19 AM   #16
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Look at the Pan. G1, the camera computer corrects the lenses faults,I think this is a good way to go as the lenses are designed by computer and they have all the error data to compensate.
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Old Nov 16, 2009, 1:56 PM   #17
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Look at the Pan. G1, the camera computer corrects the lenses faults,I think this is a good way to go as the lenses are designed by computer and they have all the error data to compensate.
The problem with that is that the image sensor has a fixed grid if photoreceptors. Correcting the image for errors in rectilinearity may make straight line straight, but it comes from a computer deciding, based on the image it has, what the image should really look like. In straightening those lines, the data from a single photoreceptor may be divided over multiple pixels, so the actual image gets watered down in the corners, reducing sharpness in areas of the image that aren't very sharp to start with. To counter that effect, the camera also increases sharpening. The result is that you get further and further away from the original image. Doing this very thing in post processing has been around for a while and the results have always been less than ideal. Doing it in the camera can only turn out worse results than doing it in post processing.

The place to correct for failings in the rectilinearity of a lens is in the design of the lens, not in the processing of the image.

BTW, straightening or leveling an image in post processing results in the same soft corners.
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Old Nov 16, 2009, 9:31 PM   #18
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I may be dreaming but.......

In 10 years we will find a D-SLR body (like the Sony A700 or Nikon D90 with a 25x f/2.8 zoom lens built in. Not a P+S camera but one with a D-SLR image sensor etc.

64GB memory cards will be the norm (128MB cards will also be found in camera bags as well) not 4 and 8GB like today.

Also single D-SLR camera batteries that will last for 3,000+ shots

My first digital camera (2000) was 1.3MP used a 120MB floppy disc and had a 3x zoom. It was slow and eat through batteries. Now I use an 8GB card, battery last for 500+ shots and we have cameras with 20x zooms. How things have changed in 9 years.

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Old Nov 16, 2009, 10:15 PM   #19
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40 years from now, we won't have cameras.... the image will be captured directly from the neuron activity of the optical cortex of your brain !!!!!
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Old Nov 16, 2009, 11:35 PM   #20
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In the year 2525... this has turned into a great string!
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