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Old Nov 30, 2003, 2:04 PM   #1
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Default noise problem with digital cameras

Is it worth buying a Digital Camera with a ISO of 400,800 or 1600 if the pictures are going to be grainy? Is there certain manufactures that are better than others for using this feature without the noise , if so which ones? thanks
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Old Nov 30, 2003, 2:17 PM   #2
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I think most compact digicams produce grainy pictures at ISO 400 or even 200.
But dSLR cams, such as the Canon EOS 300D take real great pictures at ISO 800 or even 1600.
I've seen several pics of that cam and I was really surprised about the high quality at high ISO values.
As far as I know it depends on the size of the ccd, whether the shots are grainy or not at high ISO.
So you can imagine, the size of a ccd in the Canon 300D can be much bigger than the one of a small compact cam, just because of the physical size of the cam, not to mention the better technique.
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Old Nov 30, 2003, 2:19 PM   #3
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yes it will vary from camera to camera. and of course price will have an influence on it.

http://www.pbase.com/image/23716914 iso640
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Old Nov 30, 2003, 2:22 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sjms
yes it will vary from camera to camera. and of course price will have an influence on it.

http://www.pbase.com/image/23716914 iso640
you see, that's what I meant.

Canon EOS 1Ds? wow. it costs about 8000 here in germany. :shock:
Wish I could use such a cam.
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Old Nov 30, 2003, 7:01 PM   #5
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but then again 7i/7Hi:

http://www.pbase.com/image/7743568

http://www.pbase.com/image/6613212

ain't too bad either.

http://www.pbase.com/image/4337721 D7Hi

http://www.pbase.com/image/20814263 1Ds
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Old Nov 30, 2003, 11:37 PM   #6
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I'd rather have the high ISOs with noise, than be limited by a restricted ISO...it can be cleaned up with a program like NeatImage.
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Old Nov 30, 2003, 11:40 PM   #7
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to a certain extent. noise ninja and neat image are not miracle cures for noise.
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Old Dec 1, 2003, 3:20 AM   #8
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Sensor size is not the only determining factor in noise levels in a digital camera. The Digital Rebel has pretty much the same sensor as the 10D, yet the 10D manages to keep noise down a bit better, and go a stop faster at ISO 3200 (Digital Rebel tops at ISO 1600). The 10D has better internal processing to yield less noise at higher ISO's. I do not have a 10D, but I'm using it as an example. Anyway, here are a few samples of out of camera high ISO shots from my D100:





Straight out of camera, with a little sharpening after image resizing. All shots taken with flash at f/6.3 and 1/160s for exposure. ISO 1600 seems pretty acceptable to me, easily cleaned up if necessary, but with enough light (in this case provided by the bounced flash), and short exposure period*, the resulting image has very little noise. In less than ideal conditions however (such as with available lighting at dusk/dawn) noise may become more prominent at the same ISO's shown above. *The amount of time in the exposure will influence the ammount of noise in the image as well. The shorter the exposure period, the less time the image has to accumulate noise from the sensor (there's only so much the built-in or aftermarket noise reduction solutions can do for noisy images).

Thanks goes to my sister's cat, Cayman, for being such a patient subject :lol:
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Old Dec 1, 2003, 1:02 PM   #9
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A lot depends on the light level, too. I know of someone that recently purchased a Canon EOS-300D (same sensor as the EOS-10D), with a Canon 100mm F2.0 lens for concert photography.

He is extremely dissapointed in the noise levels at ISO 800 in the stage lighting (noting a huge difference between ISO 400 and ISO 800 noise).

He is trying products now to try and clean it up (Noise Ninja and Neat Image).

Noise is more prominent when not enough light can reach the sensor (underexposed areas of a photo), since the photosensors generate much more noise when not a high enough light level reaches them.
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