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Old Apr 1, 2010, 3:04 PM   #11
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But the truth is - I do almost no work anymore in sports because the profits just aren't there. Not consistently enough.
Out of curiosity what is your market/business model now in response to the changing market?

A. C.
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Old Apr 1, 2010, 3:14 PM   #12
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Out of curiosity what is your market/business model now in response to the changing market?

A. C.
yes, if you would plz. that was sort of the reason i posted the link in the first place. to see how the business models look like these days
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Old Apr 1, 2010, 3:21 PM   #13
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Where in either article, TCAV, are you reading anything (other than the title of the one) that suggests hobbyists can produce the same image quality or compete compensation wise with pros?
I never said that a hobbyist can compete with a pro, compensation-wise. What I said was that the article (in the entire first paragraph) over-simplifies the task of becoming a pro. Sometimes it takes 10,000 photos to make someone a better photographer. Sometimes it takes 10,000,000. But sometimes it only takes 1.

That's what the article is glossing over.

Professional photographers contribute to stock photo services, as they always have. The internet allows the occasional amateur, with the occasional lucky shot, do the same. Good for them. But that doesn't make them professional photographers. But that first paragraph makes it seem so.

I have no doubt that the vast majority of stock photos are from professional photographers. I know that places like Getty won't even look at an image unless it's 20MB; that implies a level of professional equipment and sophistication all by itself. It seems to me that with the demise of print media, the demand for professional photographers is falling. In order to survive a little longer, print media are seeking less expensive alternatives for the images they use. Stock photo houses are buying from producers and selling to consumers. American farmers are struggling for exactly the same reason. The mills and distributers are paying low-ball rates for produce and selling to grocery chains who will pay whatever it takes to keep their shelves stocked. It's supply and demand, and the middlemen always win.

My point is that persistence doesn't equal quality, and the article implies that it does, and that professional photographers are hurting because amateurs are taking sales away from them. I know what that's like. I'm an independent computer consultant, supporting small businesses. My competition is the "brother-in-law that knows something about computers." But that's not the whole story. And that's not the whole story with photographers either.
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Old Apr 1, 2010, 8:53 PM   #14
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This has become an "Infinite Monkeys" business. Based on the old philosophical premise that an infinite number of monkeys banging away on an infinite number of typewriters will, at some point produce the complete works of Shakespeare. Similarly, if enough monkeys with enough cameras shoot pictures for long enough, they will produce quality pictures. The difficulty, of course is separating the trash from the treasures.
How many terabytes of pictures do we have now? Will we stop before we run out of photons to capture? Enquiring minds want to know.

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Old Apr 1, 2010, 9:05 PM   #15
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Yeah. What he said.
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Old Apr 1, 2010, 10:36 PM   #16
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so my question is then, do you make your business essentially the sifting through the mountains of available photos and specialize into a niche photog, or something else?
I mean yeah a bunch of people can take a bunch of pics, but it takes somebody with experience and knowledge to recognize a truly good and usable shot i would think...
just thinking out loud
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Old Apr 2, 2010, 8:32 AM   #17
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Out of curiosity what is your market/business model now in response to the changing market?

A. C.
THe truth is I devote more time to my son and my personal life (in addition to my day job). I take only pre-paid work right now. I could do freelance work for the local paper again but the truth is - after Uncle Sam takes his cut, it just isn't worth the time anymore. I'm sure as my son gets older and gets into organized sports I may look into starting things up again. So, I'm not the best source of information because I didn't try to evolve - I don't have the time for a side business anymore.
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Old Apr 2, 2010, 11:59 AM   #18
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John,

Thanks for your candid answer. I found myself in that position with photography 30 years ago, pre-digital and pre-internet. More recently I was in a similar situation with my part-time teaching. I relish the human face-to-face contact of classroom teaching and on-line doesn't do anything for me so I chose not to evolve.

I suspect there are others on this forum who have in the past or are currently facing the decisions you have made. More importantly I suspect there other participants in this forum with high-order skills who would like create a business, part-time or full time, as you did and you've provided an insight into the intangible costs of doing so.

Thank again.

A. C.

Last edited by ac.smith; Apr 2, 2010 at 2:02 PM.
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