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Old Jun 14, 2010, 3:50 PM   #1
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Default How would you shoot a recital?

Been visiting this site for quite a few months - great site with great advice!

Finally have a situation I need some assistance with:

My daughter has a recital (dance) next weekend. For the first time, (she has been dancing for awhile) they are allowing cameras in with only 1 rule - no flash.

The setting is a Performing Arts facility that has stage lighting. So basically a dark theater with the stage lit to the performance (sometimes very bright and sometimes very dim).

My question - what settings would you recommend? I am thinking ISO 1600, Av 2.8 & Tv between 250 & 500. Am I on the right course here?

I have a Canon 50D with 17-55 f2.8 & 70-200 f2.8 lenses.

Thank you in advance for your assistance.
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Old Jun 14, 2010, 4:30 PM   #2
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How close will you be able to get and will you be able to use a tripod or Monopod?
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Old Jun 14, 2010, 5:39 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waoldrifleman View Post
How close will you be able to get and will you be able to use a tripod or Monopod?
My seat is 10 rows back stage right. I do have a monopod I can bring (I think a tripod is too much). I do not think I can get closer than that to the stage.
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Old Jun 14, 2010, 5:44 PM   #4
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I'd use the 70-200/2.8 with the monopod, and stand in the back. If you're close, you'll be looking up at the performers, and that will give your shots an odd perspective. By standing in the back, you'll have a better view of the stage and the performers.
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Old Jun 14, 2010, 6:04 PM   #5
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Quote:
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I'd use the 70-200/2.8 with the monopod, and stand in the back. If you're close, you'll be looking up at the performers, and that will give your shots an odd perspective. By standing in the back, you'll have a better view of the stage and the performers.

Thanks for the advice.

As for the settings though - am I of the right thinking for a starting point?
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Old Jun 14, 2010, 7:02 PM   #6
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My question - what settings would you recommend? I am thinking ISO 1600, Av 2.8 & Tv between 250 & 500. Am I on the right course here?
Your settings would depend on what you can get away with. If the backdrop is featureless, you could end up with a lot of image noise at ISO 1600. I'd try to get in ahead of time, maybe at a rehearsal, see what I was up against, and see what ISO srttings I could get away with. I'd definately use the aperture wide open, use a reasonable ISO and hope for the best with the shutter speed. I'd use spot metering to expose the faces well, switch to M (Manual), and shoot continuous through any portion of the performance that my daughter was in.
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Old Jun 14, 2010, 7:16 PM   #7
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i agree the 70-200 is the best option. But the back may be too far away. You want to be within 30 feet or so. You don't want things loosely framed at 200mm. 10 rows back may be the perfect distance with that lens. You want to be able to frame in portrait orientation so that your daughter is filling the frame entirely at 200mm. It's even better if you can get a partial body crop, but no further. the key to successful high iso photography is to capture as much detail as possible and avoid all but minor cropping.
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Old Jun 14, 2010, 7:43 PM   #8
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Depending on the lighting you may need 3200iso at time wide open.

Here are some example from another member shoot a school play is similar situation.

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/pe...hairspray.html
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Old Jun 14, 2010, 9:48 PM   #9
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Use spot metering to meter on the dancers, as a dark b/g can throw off your metering in matrix mode and leave you with overexposed tutus.

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Old Jun 15, 2010, 2:07 PM   #10
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Thanks for all of the responses. All of you need to pat yourself on the back for giving great advice (not just to me but to all as i have read).

Shoturtle - Thanks for the link - those were great pics. But it appeared to my eye that they only had white spots (as opposed to the color). I could only find one pic where I saw a touch of purple.

Having attended many of these over the years (and cameras were prohibited) I know there will be every color of the rainbow in the spots. And honestly, that is my main concern. Another daughter of mine has done school plays and I got wonderful pictures. But that was white spots only. My apologies for not sharing this information in the beginning. What adjustment to make (if any) when you are faced with multiple color spots of light?

I do have a beginners understanding of light (thanks to Strobist & Light: Science & Magic). And unfortunately, I cannot move for optimum angles to take full advantage of the light.

Thank you for your patience & understanding. I hope I have better stated my concern.
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