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Old Jul 6, 2010, 5:03 PM   #41
BDD
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Funny thing is. After all this effort. Getting my D300 to do 5.8 FPS I'm going to go back to shooting single-frame AF. I prefer to have control of the photo I'm trying to get instead of leaving it to chance shooting in continuous mode. But it is nice to know I can get 5.8 now (d-lighting off).

Related question (or comment...depends how you look at it). Using a hot-shoe mounted flash like my Nikon SB-800 is it possible for it to keep up with the 3.8 or 5.8 FPS firing rate of the camera? Or would I need a "studio lighting system"? Actually I'm not sure even the studio lights can shoot that fast (could be wrong...hope I am) since most have a recycle time of 1-2 seconds. I think the 200w lights can do just under 1 second.

I tried using my flash when shooting off a burst. First 2 came out well lit others dark with maybe the 10th frame lit again then dark rest of the way. Hopefully I'm missing something. Would be nice to get my SB-800 to fire in-sync with my camera at 5.8 FPS. With all 29 frames lit.

Last edited by BDD; Jul 6, 2010 at 10:54 PM.
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Old Jul 6, 2010, 5:10 PM   #42
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Recycle time and fps you can achieve will depend on the flash power being used (longer flash burst lengths will result in slower recycle times, shorter flash burst lengths will result in faster recycle times).

If you are shooting at closer ranges, using wider apertures and higher ISO speeds, you can get a lot of photos in a burst (since the flash can use a much shorter burst length for proper exposure at closer ranges and higher ISO speeds with a wider aperture that lets in more light, with the capacitor not being fully discharged between photos in a burst). Shooting further away subjects with lower ISO speeds and/or narrower apertures (higher f/stop numbers) will result in fewer frames in a burst, because the flash burst will need to be longer to provide enough light for proper exposure.

For example, if you're using as much as a 1/8 power flash burst, you may only get a handful of photos in a burst before a pause. With a full power flash (much longer burst), you may need 2 or 3 seconds to recharge the capacitor after each photo. See your flash user guide for more info on max photos in a burst at various flash power levels.
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Old Jul 6, 2010, 11:01 PM   #43
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At full power, the SB-800, fires at 1/1050 flash duration. At 1/8 power it's 1/5900. And also according to the manual...using 2000 mAh NiMH batteries (I use Maha PowerEx 2700 mAh) the "min recycle time is 4 sec". So if it's 4 sec then it looks like the SB-800 wouldn't be able to do more than 1 FPS with a 4 sec pause between "ready to fire" times. Guess I would need a setup as shown in this YouTube clip to get 6-11 FPS...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7JMB...eature=related

...I found this YouTube video clip using my SB-800 flash + 1 AA "mini battery pack" (attached to side of SB-800 flash) + SD-8A battery pack (6 AA batteries) to allow the SB-800 to fire at 11 FPS (DSLR was a D3). The flash is set to M 1/1 (full power). For a total of 11 AA batteries.

I think the clip said using this battery-pack there is no recycle time? Any how it works. So if it can do 11 FPS I'm sure it can do 6 FPS. It looks to be the only way. Correct?? Or is there a way to set the SB-800 alone (4 batteries) to do 6 FPS consistently w/o going to the trouble of the YouTube video clip rig?

Last edited by BDD; Jul 7, 2010 at 8:12 AM.
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Old Nov 11, 2010, 9:26 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
I'd also see if you have Active D-Lighting enabled, as that can impact performance with some Nikon models (turn it off and see what you get if it's not just firmware version and lighting conditions causing it).
That is correct.... as page 166 says this:

When Active D-Lighting is on, the capacity of the memory buffer drops and additional time is required to record images (pg. 406).
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Old Nov 11, 2010, 9:46 PM   #45
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BDD View Post
...I found this YouTube video clip using my SB-800 flash + 1 AA "mini battery pack" (attached to side of SB-800 flash) + SD-8A battery pack (6 AA batteries) to allow the SB-800 to fire at 11 FPS (DSLR was a D3). The flash is set to M 1/1 (full power). For a total of 11 AA batteries.

I think the clip said using this battery-pack there is no recycle time? Any how it works. So if it can do 11 FPS I'm sure it can do 6 FPS. It looks to be the only way. Correct?? Or is there a way to set the SB-800 alone (4 batteries) to do 6 FPS consistently w/o going to the trouble of the YouTube video clip rig?
My guess is that if you are able to get the flash to fire that fast for more than a couple seconds at a time, something is going to melt, catch fire, or burn out.
Strobes produce a tremendous amount of light and heat. The reason they don't burn up is because of the very short duration, and low duty cycle. If you increase the frequency of the flash, you increase the duty cycle. Take it beyond a certain point, and it's goodbye strobe.

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Old Nov 12, 2010, 8:50 AM   #46
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Thanks guys. Good information.

I would have preferred to have d-lighting on when trying to achieve max FPS. But if I have to turn it off then so be it. With a maybe more time in PP tweaking the highlights and/or shadows. If needed.

As for using my SB-800 and trying to achieve 6 FPS I will keep JimC's suggestion in mind. I was shooting at full power. And I might buy the Nikon portable power pack later. That should allow my flash to more consistently fire at 6 FPS and not get missed shots. Even when set to 1/1. Never tried using strobes.
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