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Old Aug 9, 2002, 11:15 AM   #1
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Default Photos have ghosts, not blurs... anyone know why?

I was playing with my Nikon 5700 on manual (roughly F7 with play ranges of 1/30 - 1/125, ISO 100) at the beach (yes, we actually have beaches in Cleveland!).

Now, I'm a bad photographer when it comes to manual settings -- I'm still learning to focus and such. But, I had an unusual phenomenon with my pics. I expected to see blurry images from my moving subjects (kids building sand castles and fat seagulls), but instead there were two translucent, ghost like images, as if the shutter took two distinct pictures. Imagine doing a jumping jack: the photos showed the person clapping their hands at the point above their head (12:00 position) AND superimposed over that a distinct other image of the hands at the side position (hands at 3 and 9). There is no blurr between the two points of motion.

Any clues? There were about a dozen that came out like that.

Thanks!
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Old Aug 9, 2002, 1:24 PM   #2
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It would help if you could show some examples and tell us what shutter speed you took them at.
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Old Aug 10, 2002, 11:19 AM   #3
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Using your jumping jack example: The hands are motionless as they clap over the head and they are motionless while they are at their lowest position. In between, they are moving rapidly with no pause. The motion in between is fast enough that the sensor is not recording enough to show.

Same principle with hummingbird photos. You'll notice that almost all hummingbird photos, that don't show a blur, show the wings at either the top or bottom of the stroke.

This principle has been used to take a photo of a street scene and show only the stationary objects. Take a very long exposure (slow film and ND filter). The people moving through the scene aren't there long enough to register.
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Old Aug 10, 2002, 8:14 PM   #4
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JimHunt-- that may be the right explanation. It could be that the motion of my kids in the photos was only stationary enough for the camera to catch in a couple of spots. They weren't doing jumping jacks, of course, but there was the type of stop and go motion that you'll see when they're scooping sand for sand castles. I've finally uploaded an example for folks to examine, and possibly diagnose:


http://yama.clearlight.com/~crowmama/ghostkidsbeach.jpg

again, thanks!


[Edited on 8-11-2002 by crowmama]
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Old Aug 10, 2002, 8:33 PM   #5
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Maybe this is an answer to my own question. In the photo, even stationary objects, like the sandcastle, have the ghost, while the moving waves of Lake Erie do not. One friend of mine suggested it was a camera shake-- I was not using a tripod, and my shutter speed was slow enough to catch my unsteady hands moving the camera body.

I think that might be it!
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Old Aug 10, 2002, 10:45 PM   #6
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Definitely camera shake. Makes an interesting photo, though.
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