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Old Sep 5, 2010, 3:57 PM   #1
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Default Indoor lens

What would be the best lens for indoor photography? Let's take it to the extreme- for wedding photography?

1. Tamron 17-50

2. Tamron 28-75

3. Sigma 18-50

4. Sigma 28-70

5. Any other lens in that price range? (No, no 17-55 or 24-70 for me )

Notice I'm talking about the 2.8 versions, in case there are other versions...

Thank you guys (and gals)

EDIT: I'm shooting a crop body. x1.6

Last edited by Ishay; Sep 5, 2010 at 4:01 PM.
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Old Sep 5, 2010, 4:25 PM   #2
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tammy 28-75 would be a good range. But it would be a bit tight for a group shot.
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Old Sep 5, 2010, 5:15 PM   #3
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Honestly it would take a combination of #1 and #2 + a longer zoom to even begin to consider covering a wedding shoot.

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Old Sep 5, 2010, 6:25 PM   #4
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First question, are you wanting to shoot weddings or is that just a possible example? If you do then are we talking you are going to a friends/family wedding and you want to get some shots or it is more serious than that?

If it is wedding shooting then f2.8 might not be enough, it usually is but there are times when I need to go brighter, I actually use a lens that is consistent f4 as my major lens but have IS (there isn't much movement in a wedding). I have a f2.8 as a backup and a couple of f1.8s as well. You just can never tell at weddings what you will end up with regarding light so you need to be prepared.

To determine focal length needed, it will depend where you are going to be and the shots you want. On a crop body you need the 17 or 18 mm for groups so I would rather than than going out to 70 or 75mm if that was the only choice.
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Old Sep 5, 2010, 6:54 PM   #5
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I agree with Mark that, if you're shooting at a wedding, you need a flash.

I also agree with Mark that, if you'll be shooting people around a table in a crowded reception hall, you'll need something pretty wide. Something that only goes as wide as 24mm or 28mm won't work well on an APS-C body.

Those are all very good lenses, but the stabilized versions are less so. If you'll be using flash, then you can get away with the unstabilized versions. If you'll be trying to shoot in available light, the stabilized versions provide lower image quality.
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Old Sep 6, 2010, 12:20 AM   #6
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On another forum was discussed a woman who makes a good living shooting weddings using an old dSLR (Pentax K10D), the DA18-55 kit lens, and a big flash, and nothing else except skill (and good PP work). Many comments arose: OH NO, she has the wrong camera-lens-flash-etc. Those commenting thusly do NOT make a living shooting weddings. Yes, others in the trade use more elaborate gear; my bro-in-law hauled around a Mamiya MF outfit before quitting with spinal problems. So it's a matter of 1) personal style and 2) delivering what the clients want. Clients don't care about your gear.
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Old Sep 6, 2010, 3:50 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RioRico View Post
On another forum was discussed a woman who makes a good living shooting weddings using an old dSLR (Pentax K10D), the DA18-55 kit lens, and a big flash, and nothing else except skill (and good PP work). Many comments arose: OH NO, she has the wrong camera-lens-flash-etc. Those commenting thusly do NOT make a living shooting weddings. Yes, others in the trade use more elaborate gear; my bro-in-law hauled around a Mamiya MF outfit before quitting with spinal problems. So it's a matter of 1) personal style and 2) delivering what the clients want. Clients don't care about your gear.
That's fine for the shots where flash is allowed as you can get away with being stopped down, however, it's not going to work in a church where you are not allowed to use flash (there are lots that still fall into this category, although I'm not really sure why). Also if someone wants to shoot creatively, I hope that most wedding photographers in the current market do, then you simply can't do this with a slow piece of glass. Yes, she might be making a living due to a good rep or being cheap, but if someone was looking for a shooter with creative flair then unlikely they would be going to here. I know we are not sure what the thoughts of the OP are, but for someone wanting to get into the wedding game, you need to have an edge, something different. There are lots of people now with a camera capable of shooting weddings, but far too many of them don't have the skills so go cheap and devalue wedding photographers.
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Old Sep 6, 2010, 7:28 AM   #8
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I agree with mark. Firstly flash photography at weddings is very annoying and ruins the entire experience. The photographer is supposed to melt into the back ground and go unnoticed for the most part. When you're shooting the posed shots its a different story but the posed shots make up very little of a nice wedding package.
There are some that will take old school if the price is good and are willing to put up with the annoying strobe in the eyes every few seconds. You are right that some customers dont care about what gear you have for the most part as long as you dont interupt the proceedings and the final output is worthy of what they paid. On the other side there are many that would cringe if they paid big $$$ for a photographer and they showed up with lame gear. Unfortunately their perception of you has a lot to do with success as a wedding photog. Show up well dressed with a clean professional appearance carrying what they perceive to be professional gear and they are ecstatic from the onset. On the flip side show up in shorts, flip flops, a goofy hat carrying an antiquated camera with a flash that is WWII vintage and bridzilla will surely appear! This perception has nothing to do with what kind of photos you produce, its purely human nature.
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Old Sep 6, 2010, 12:04 PM   #9
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First of all thank you for all your responses.

Now, I am not going to shoot weddings professionally. I was just trying to figure out which of the above lenses would perform best under extreme conditions. A wedding seemed pretty extreme, this is why I gave it as an example.

Assuming I drop the 24-28mm wide (because indoors are most of the time small places), which one of the two left would perform better? (Image and build quality, speed, any other important criteria...)

Thanks again.
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Old Sep 6, 2010, 12:06 PM   #10
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I would personally go for the Tamron non IS.
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