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Old Sep 26, 2010, 7:16 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by imut View Post
This explains why it is expensive
Well, no, not exactly.

What makes a polarizing filter expensive is that it's actually two filters, one that mounts directly to the lens, and a second filter that swivels on the first. That requires more engineering and QC than making any two filters, let alone just one.
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Old Sep 26, 2010, 7:34 AM   #12
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I will shot winter games on mountain as i mentioned earlier, should i buy it? Does it give my money back with quality?
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Old Sep 26, 2010, 8:15 AM   #13
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I will shot winter games on mountain as i mentioned earlier, should i buy it? Does it give my money back with quality?
For that, I would definately get a polarizing filter. You'll lose a stop or two of light, which will help with the snow, and it will accentuate the other colors in the scene.
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Old Sep 26, 2010, 12:28 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rjseeney View Post
A polarizing filter is the only filter whose effects cannot be easily duplicated in post work.
IR-pass.
Neutral density.
Graduated neutral density.
Red filter when shooting B&W.
A +1 diopter lens to decrease DOF.
Split-diopter to apparently increase DOF.

These can be difficult or impossible to replicate in PP.
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Old Sep 26, 2010, 1:11 PM   #15
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IR-pass.
Neutral density.
Graduated neutral density.
Red filter when shooting B&W.
A +1 diopter lens to decrease DOF.
Split-diopter to apparently increase DOF.

These can be difficult or impossible to replicate in PP.
any color filter when shooting b&w really.... yellow green, it goes on and on :P
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Old Sep 26, 2010, 1:33 PM   #16
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Not so. See
Case Study: Conversions to Black & White
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Old Sep 26, 2010, 1:50 PM   #17
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I was referring to film
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Old Sep 26, 2010, 2:28 PM   #18
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I was referring to film
... in post-processing?
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Old Sep 26, 2010, 2:49 PM   #19
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Im dumb, just ignore me.
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Old Sep 26, 2010, 5:10 PM   #20
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Linear polarizing filters are not terribly expensive, and will work very well with P&S cameras, and Probably work with Dslrs while usiing live view (different autofocus system), but aren't too good for normal use with Dslr, because they interfere with the phase detection of the autofocus. (of course, if you manually focus....)

Circular polarizers sort of are two filters - a linear polarizer, with a special, quarter wave filter behind it, that sort of re-randomizes (ok, not real technical term there) the light, allowing the phase detectors to function.
The reason all polarizing filters are made to rotate is to allow you to compensate for the phase of reflected light which is causing the glare, or lack of contrast.

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