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Old Oct 4, 2010, 5:57 PM   #11
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Ok then RAW + Automatic Mode + 18-55

how is it?

This ceremony will be in evening so there wouldn't be light coming from windows.
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Old Oct 4, 2010, 6:23 PM   #12
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What type of location? How close can the camera be to the ceremony (which will impact flash range, ability to get accurate focus, and more)?

There are a lot of variables involved, and I'd strongly suggest getting a [reputable] pro photographer to take the photos if they're important to you.

I don't want to sound too negative, but I would not count on getting many keepers trying to hand a camera with a [dim] kit lens on it to someone that doesn't know anything about photography (or even using it yourself if you don't have a lot of experience taking photos in the same conditions. ;-)

I would certainly not expect to get keepers indoors at night using a kit lens without a flash, unless the photos are taken when the subjects are motionless (unless the lighting is *much* better than I'd expect it to be), and if you don't have a good eye for light, I'd expect them to turn out badly.

From the sounds of your posts, you're also expecting to take group photos and more. For best results, you're going to want a good external flash and have someone that knows what they're doing taking the photos.

Have you tried taking photos in similar conditions before?

If worse comes to worse, your best bet might be using Auto on the camera to reduce potential mistakes. Even though the flash photos may come out with a "deer in the headlights" look to them, that may be better than no photos at all (or blurry photos if you don't use a flash). But, I'd suggest finding someone that has good gear (camera bodies, lenses, flashes) with lots of experience taking photos in the same conditions if the photos are important to you.
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Old Oct 4, 2010, 7:13 PM   #13
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Here's a recent thread on the subject you may want to browse through that has some good ideas in it.

http://forums.steves-digicams.com/ge...y-problem.html
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Old Oct 5, 2010, 2:20 AM   #14
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Quote:
Have you tried taking photos in similar conditions before?
No i haven't got any chance taking photos in similar conditions before.

Quote:
I'd suggest finding someone that has good gear (camera bodies, lenses, flashes) with lots of experience taking photos in the same conditions if the photos are important to you.
I will try to find.

Thank you for the link
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Old Oct 5, 2010, 3:38 AM   #15
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Hi Imut I am assuming you are part of the wedding as you cannot take pictures. So next thing is what do expect from your friend whos taking the pictures.
I will standby my suggestion of the 50mm lens for a couple of reasons, first it will make the camera lighter so therefore easier to hold it also it takes the zoom factor out. I have seen people with p&s with zoom still walk about trying to get the shot framed. The 50mm can be used at lower iso so you could crop pictures later.
I also assume that there will be a pro there to. maybe leave the camera at home and buy some pitures may be less stressfull and you can sit and relax. When my daughter got married I just sat back did my bit (pay lol) enjoyed the day. Hope this helps you
Grant
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Old Oct 5, 2010, 3:04 PM   #16
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Also be careful in thinking an 8g card will do the trick. I also have a T2i and shoot RAW + jpeg and the 8 Gig will get you about 220-240 shots max. Couple this with an in-experienced shooter and you will may end up with fewer keeper shots than you would like. Steven
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Old Oct 5, 2010, 3:18 PM   #17
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Thank you Grant, this is another option, i also wouldn't think what happened to my camera body, lenses etc, yes i am the part of the wedding.

Actually it takes 217 shots steven and i was thinking of it too. There are also 3 cards each are 4 GB, of course i need to explain how to change cards.

As most of you saying "Hiring a pro would be a better option if you can't shot" thank you guys.
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Old Oct 5, 2010, 8:44 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imut View Post
...Actually it takes 217 shots steven and i was thinking of it too. There are also 3 cards each are 4 GB, of course i need to explain how to change cards..
You should go out tonight and buy a 16GB or bigger. Asking a noob to also change the card "when it fills up" is asking for trouble.

As for someone other than you taking pictures at a wedding? It happens all the time. p&s'ers abound. You should reduce your expectations. You are hoping for good. Relax. You'll get some nice snapshots. and a lot of oof, under-exposed shots. I always give my dslr to one of the teens at family get-togethers. People don't mind so much a younger person taking pictures. They get sick of me. I tell them "get at least one picture of everybody here. get candid shots. take some of yourself. don't drop the camera".

They always return pictures I wouldn't have gotten. Now this is a wedding. My quick read didn't reveal you stating there would be a pro. I hope you're not the groom. and if these pictures are all the b&g will have for posterity, I'm sorry for them.

Last point, give your stand-in a checklist of pictures to get. Ask them to just do their best. and give them extra batteries for the flash.
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Old Oct 5, 2010, 11:52 PM   #19
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Something I have seen done, to good effect, is to provide disposable film cameras at each table at the reception. Collect the cameras later and get the film developed and consolidated to a slideshow. Often hilarious, and the pics will include more memories than a pro photographer would have gotten, though a lot less formal.

brian
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Old Oct 6, 2010, 2:34 AM   #20
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Yes I used that idea at my daughters wedding went down a treat and as you say some great pictures.
I know hiring a pro means a lot of expense but we had our wedding in Atlanta and we had to get families transported from the UK out as well as the grooms people from other parts of the USA. We had know idea of what the charges were we ended up getting a list of photographers and choosing 2, one from the top end price scale and one from the cheaper end. It was the later we went with as my daughter felt so at ease with him and the results were great. Really best luck and you should be able to enjoy the day too.
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