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Old Nov 7, 2010, 10:14 AM   #11
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what if i am transitioning from my house (about 70), then out to my vehicle (about 40 inside, and about 30 outside), then it takes about 10 minutes to warm the vehicle back up to 70.. will the camera be ok for those 10-15min?

i know that sounds like a stupid question, but i have terrified of doing something wrong to my camera.
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Old Nov 7, 2010, 12:45 PM   #12
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That shouldn't be much of a problem. Where difficulties enter is if you have been out shooting for a couple hours or more at thirty degrees and head back home. The insides of the camera (and lens) will take an additional couple hours to warm back up to above the dew point, If they are not contained, moisture will condense. If there is a path for moisture to get to your equipment, it will. An insulated camera bag might help some, but is really only going to slow down the warmup of your gear, giving more time for the moisture to condense.
IMO, bread bags are for bread. They don't seal tightly enough, and even ziplock bags get pinholes and cracks. This is why I recommend dessicant in the bags.
Science experiment: Put your lens (or someone else's , preferably) in a bread bag, and put it in your freezer overnight. Remove it next morning and see how well the bread bag prevents frost.

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Old Nov 8, 2010, 8:53 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VTphotog View Post
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IMO, bread bags are for bread. They don't seal tightly enough, and even ziplock bags get pinholes and cracks. This is why I recommend dessicant in the bags.
Science experiment: Put your lens (or someone else's , preferably) in a bread bag, and put it in your freezer overnight. Remove it next morning and see how well the bread bag prevents frost.

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True, but that isn't the situation of moving from cold-dry to warm-moist. The better experiment would be to take a heavy, smallish glass (instead of a lens) from the freezer, put it into the bag of your choice and see how much condensation forms on the glass in the time it takes to warm up.

I've found a bread bag works just fine, but folks should do their own tests. Simple enough to do.
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Old Nov 9, 2010, 11:29 AM   #14
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maybe this is a stupid question, but what if i just take a large plastic bag (possibly a kitchen-sized trash bag) and bag up my entire camera bag with all the equipment in it? that would be instead of bagging each lens/body that goes from cold to hot individually.
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Old Nov 11, 2010, 10:41 AM   #15
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That will work just fine Eric. However, since there is more stuff (thermal mass), it will take longer to warm up. And the camera bag will act as insulation so it will take even longer to warm up.

Just don't be in a hurry to get at your stuff.
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Old Nov 22, 2010, 8:39 PM   #16
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“I've found a bread bag works just fine, but folks should do their own tests. Simple enough to do.”



Well, maybe experiments aren't real simple to set up.

A suggested test for whatever you call cold where ever you live.


  1. Pick the coldest day of the year to do the experiment. I mean, really, what else are you going to do outside that day? This only takes brief jumps outdoors. From experience, a short* amount of time is what you would spend bare-ass neeked.
  2. Stick a couple chunks of glass and chunks of metal outdoors (in the shade) for a couple hours. Candle holders, old ash trays, statues, ...
  3. Put a glass-metal pairs into whatever kind of condensation protection you are thinking about using.
  4. Decide what you want to do.
I haven't really done all that testing, but bread bags have served me well for many years. Likely there is something better.


* Less time than it takes to use fully detached toilet facilities – otherwise known as an outhouse. Do wear something on your feet much below freezing.
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Old Nov 22, 2010, 9:39 PM   #17
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Well, it hasn't been as cold the last few winters as we used to get, so I haven't been able to set up the photo that I have wanted to get for quite a while. Take a bucket of water from the house outside, slowly pour out the water so the ice builds up - as the bucket and water cool, the water inside freezes to the built up ice, leaving the tipped up bucket supported by its own icicle. Needs to be about -30 or so to do this, though. Big trouble is I can't get someone to do the stunt while I photograph it, or do the photography while I do the stunt.

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Old Nov 23, 2010, 12:01 PM   #18
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Uhm guys, should I have the same worries about my compact as ewheeler with his DSLR ?

Does it need 'winter protection' ?
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Old Nov 23, 2010, 12:32 PM   #19
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Condensation can occur with anything being moved from cold to warm, and that water does no good at all to any kind of camera. About the only real difference between a compact and a dSLR is that the compact will warm up faster since it is smaller.

My favorite cold weather (about forty below) stunts are tossing a cup of tea/coffee/hot water into the air. Not a single drop hits the ground - it all evaporates into the air that is warmed and drifts away as a little cloud.

The other is blowing soap bubbles. The soap/water envelope freezes and you can see the crystals forming. Very pretty. When it his the ground it either remains intace or breaks into fragments.
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Old Nov 24, 2010, 2:45 AM   #20
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I won't be shooting at -40 C, that's for sure !

Nothing under -5...
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