Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Dec 23, 2010, 4:44 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
hanalwala's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Dubai (U.A.E.)
Posts: 268
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by frank-in-toronto View Post
maybe the canon xsi can only do it in live view:
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneos450d/page10.asp

I checked my camera....The live view function is set at "ON"... how do I go to Optional "thirds" grid lines overlay ..?
__________________
Canon Digital EOS 60D D-SLR
Canon Lens 55-250mm
Canon Lens 18-55mm
Canon Lens EF 70-200mm f/2.8L USM IS
Canon Lens EF500mm F4L IS USM
Sigma 105mm f2.8 EX Macro
Tokina 11-16mm f2.8 Wide angle
Website:www.hussainnalwala-photography.com
hanalwala is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 23, 2010, 12:35 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Belize & UK
Posts: 463
Default

I don't know of any camera that can show a grid in the viewfinder, because it's software generated. Compacts can do it, and probably most DSLRs that have live view when in that mode.

I have to say the "rule of thirds" has always seemed to me a bit of a non-rule. I always frame subjectively so it "looks right", and never follow rules written down by others. There are times when exact symmetry is called for, but on more occasions they will make a picture look a bit mechanical and contrived. The happy balance only comes with experience.
peterbj7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 23, 2010, 1:55 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,544
Default

It's a rule of thumb. That is, it's a starting place, where you look at the frame, and alter the composition before pressing the shutter button. Where the image ends up may or may not be a strict interpretation of the "Rule of Thirds", but it's just a way to get you to think about composition and put the subject in the center of the context instead of just in the center of the frame.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 23, 2010, 2:08 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
VTphotog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Extreme Northeastern Vermont, USA
Posts: 4,214
Default

Most of the rules of photography are in the nature of guidelines. The only really hard and fast rules I can think of are -"Remove the lens cap.", and "Get the shot." (prior to digital, there was also " Make sure there is film in the camera.")

Have a Happy Christmas, (or Holiday of choice) everyone.

brian

BTW, many DSLRs have user replaceable focus screens, with available ROT grids and other specialized screens.

Last edited by VTphotog; Dec 23, 2010 at 2:27 PM. Reason: added info
VTphotog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 23, 2010, 2:12 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
frank-in-toronto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Toronto Canada
Posts: 1,083
Default

This "rule" is not new to photography. It has been known by painters for eons. literally. we can use it to make pictures more appealing to the eye, or not. but that doesn't change the fact that it works. Now, anything done to excess may not be so pleasant. Anyway, for beginners, it's a good place to start.
frank-in-toronto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 24, 2010, 2:40 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
BillDrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hay River Township, WI
Posts: 2,512
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by peterbj7 View Post
The great advantage of using digital is that you don't have to believe anyone' advice. Work out what the possible shooting/framing modes are and shoot lots of pictures systematically using the different rules. I think you'll see for yourself which works best.
...
Peter has it right: don't believe anyone's advice, do your own experiments. The advice often is a good guide for what experiments to do.

In this case, try overshooting and then cropping. Overshooting means having a lot more in the frame than you figure on ever using - something like figuring that a focal length of 100 mm will give the shot you want, then zooming out to about 50mm.

Then crop so the main point of interest is in various positions and see what works best.

You will be throwing away a large number of pixels, but this is an experiment in framing, not resolution.
BillDrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 24, 2010, 3:07 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
rjseeney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Taylor Mill, Kentucky
Posts: 2,398
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by peterbj7 View Post
I don't know of any camera that can show a grid in the viewfinder, because it's software generated. Compacts can do it, and probably most DSLRs that have live view when in that mode.

All midlevel and above Nikons (D80, D90, D5k, D300 etc) all have gridlines available in the viewfinder. I used to have the N80 film slr and still have an f100 that also has viewfinder gridlines.
rjseeney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Dec 24, 2010, 3:59 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,093
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by VTphotog View Post
Most of the rules of photography are in the nature of guidelines. The only really hard and fast rules I can think of are -"Remove the lens cap.", and "Get the shot."
I have known some folks who would have been well-advised to violate these two rules...
tclune is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 5:04 PM.