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Old Jan 10, 2011, 10:57 AM   #1
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Default Does White Balance change lens to lens?

Is a custom White Balance setting lens specific?

For an example I have been shooting in High School auditoriums and theater settings where light can be inconsistent at best. Because of the distances involved I have been using my 300mm f/2.8 during the events and then switching to a shorter lens for afterward when people can go onto the stage.

On stage, the colored lights are more spot focused so I know to watch for that. (if I set it under an Amber light then shoot under the Amber whenever possible)

Minimum focusing distance is an issue with my older Minolta 300mm f/2.8 APO lens so I have to set the white balance with with a short lens then change to the longer one.

I there anything I need to watch for or give special consideration in these situations?

Thank you

Steve
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Old Jan 10, 2011, 11:09 AM   #2
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Older Minolta lenses all had a consistant color, so inconsistancies in white balance were not a problem if you stuck to Minolta lenses. (Minolta was the only company to do this consistantly, btw.) But if you're swtiching from your Minolta 300/2.8 to a Sony or third party lens, you may have a problem.

Color corrections are easier if you shoot RAW, btw.
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Old Jan 10, 2011, 11:15 AM   #3
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Yes, it can change with different lenses, especially if they're a different brand.

I've seen that same issue shooting with a custom white balance when switching between lenses like my Tamron 35-105mm f/2.8 and Minolta 100mm f/2 (WB is off with my Tamron after setting a custom WB using my Minolta 100mm f/2).

If they're all Minolta lenses, there probably won't be much of an issue (although coatings may still vary between some lenses).

I'd set it separately for each lens if possible when you need to use a custom white balance (or test how they behave in advance using the same setting to see if it may be a problem).

Note that the A700, A850 and A900 can store 3 custom WB settings, letting you change between them as desired to make that process easier. Unfortunately, the A2xx, 3xx and 5xx models only offer the ability to store 1 custom WB setting.
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Old Jan 10, 2011, 12:11 PM   #4
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I have never done much shooting in RAW but have started and I can definitely see an advantage.

I did use a Minolta lens (24mm f/2.8). This was my second trip out to try this type of photography and while it was better than the first try it was not by much so I am trying to eliminate variables.

There are members here who make people photography look easy until you go out and try.

Thank you for your replies.

Steve

JimC, How do you like the Tamron 35-105?
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Old Jan 10, 2011, 1:41 PM   #5
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I like the Tamron (SP 35-105mm f/2.8 AF lens). It's not quite as sharp as my Minolta 100mm f/2 at f/2.8. But, it's not bad for a zoom and gives you more framing flexibility. It's even better on a full frame model (A850, A900).
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Old Jan 16, 2011, 10:07 AM   #6
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Ive personally never had a WB issue with different lenses but the colors and contrast definitely changes. When changing different light sources, especially colored lights its going to present a challange when going from long to short. The long will see mostly the amber light where the short is going to take in other light sources as well and consequently change the WB.
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Old Jan 16, 2011, 12:53 PM   #7
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Shooting stage is not easy. i would shoot high iso if the lights aren't bright, raw+jpg and use IDC to edit the few images I really wanted to look great. Turn DR off so you can play with it pp. Raw will allow you to concentrate on the composition and exposure, leaving aside all WB issues. Free yourself!

and you seriously have a 300mm f/2.8!! must be heavy!
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Old Jan 16, 2011, 6:35 PM   #8
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"and you seriously have a 300mm f/2.8!! must be heavy!"

It is a f/2.8 APO lens from the late 1980's and I think is supposed to weight right at five and a half pounds. I would have to use the monopod but would be better off using the 70-200 f/2.8 and getting much closer. My shooting angle was off among other things so I seem to be making all of the mistakes right by the numbers.


On stage, trying to get posed shots after the event, is where everything went down the tubes in real time. Every time I took a step the light changed color. Once I knew to pay attention it was not as bad. I remember the reviewers for the A550 lamenting the lack of a row of quick access buttons down the left hand side of the lcd and I now understand why. The menu navigation is easy enough but the buttons would make things quicker.

I am shooting raw+jpg but trying to get my house sold takes priority over learning new software. My post processing skills are non-existent but there are a few things that have to come first. I have PSE Elements 8 and a For Dummies book to get me started just have to find a few days to do it.

The learning curve seems a bit steep at times but seeing the improvement over time makes it worthwhile.

thank you for the replies

Steve
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Old Jan 16, 2011, 6:42 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Boat Guy View Post
... takes priority over learning new software. ...
i quite understand that. Sony IDC had no learning curve. Just install, open an arw file, move the sliders and OUTPUT the jpeg. as you move the sliders, you see the result. You'll see the White Balance tab right away. Open it, select the radio button for Colour Temperature and move the slider back and forth. done.
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Old Jan 17, 2011, 12:03 PM   #10
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I agree with you Frank.

As has been pointed out here many times post processing is a big part of photography and more so with DSLR. I had two Kodak P series P&S and as long as you had a computer that could deal with the clunky core code in Easyshare presentable results were not difficult to attain.

It is frustrating to post an image that I know has issues and someone pops it up a few posts later in the thread with the issues improved. I will get there it just takes a bit of time to learn the new tools.

The editor of our county paper sends me out to shoot events and meetings and he is happy with what I bring back. I shoot in RAW and he does the post work saving as a .tiff if I remember correctly. I am more of a paid apprentice (with not much pay) than anything else but it is great experience and an opportunity to learn newspaper photography from someone who has been in the business for close to forty years.

From a technical standpoint I feel comfortable using the camera and with loads of advice and assistance from here my eye for the composition is improving. Once I get my arms around PSE 8 I should be good to go.

Give it another ten or twelve years and I might be able to take a decent photo.

Steve
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