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Old Mar 22, 2011, 3:18 AM   #11
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I see no obvious distortion.

What resolution are you running your monitor at?

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Old Mar 22, 2011, 3:30 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillDrew View Post
What kind of distortion do you see in that picture of a Lion?
I see little or no distortion because I'm not trying to stretch the picture to
fit a different AR. The OP wants to fill a 16x10in screen without distorting
the image. Stretching it to fit would make it a bit wider so that the lion would
be a bit fatter.
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Old Mar 22, 2011, 7:55 AM   #13
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Theres always the chance to add some canvas, clone a little and fill the 16 x 10 screen without distortions. But that needs some heavy pp tho. Beautiful pick!
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Old Mar 23, 2011, 2:51 AM   #14
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Default photo to fit the screen

Perhaps you can see what I mean on this photo of my screen. I am just about ready to give up and live with it.
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Old Mar 23, 2011, 12:12 PM   #15
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Again.... what resolution are you currently running?

Find it at...
Control Panel // Appearance & Personalization // Adjust Screen Resolution


It would be easier for us to tell if you put up a picture of a circle or a square and we could see that it looks like an oval or a rectangle.

I'd bet that you have a 16:10 monitor with a native resolution of something like 1440x900 and you have your video card set to a 4:3 ratio something like 1280x960 or 800x600. This will distort the image.


With LCD monitors you ALWAYS keep the video card resolution MATCHING the native resolution of the monitor.

With LCD monitors, if the manufacturer's original specification said this is a 1440x900 resolution, then you MUST have the video card delivering 1440x900 to the monitor.

LCD monitors do not tolerate lower resolutions as well as the old CRT monitors did. They do not scale as well.

Other than the obvious distortion that will occur if you mismatch a 16:10 monitor with a 4:3 resolution, where a circle becomes an oval and a square becomes a rectangle, even if you do match 16:10 to a 16:10 but use a lower resolution you will also likely introduce a lack of sharpness into the image. Curved edges will show "jaggies", a stair step effect on the curve. Keeping the monitor's video card setting at its' native resolution gives you the sharpest clear image.

I am aware that people run their LCD monitors at a lower resolution because they cannot read the smaller fonts or want larger icons. There are better ways to make the font readable than by lowering resolution.

The easiest is to use reading glasses as I woefully had to start doing a couple of years ago. But, in Windows, you can increase your system font size and system icon size.
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/d....mspx?mfr=true

Or... in most web browsers you can increase the font size using the mouse scroll wheel and CTRL key. Different browsers.... a different key combination. For FireFox, Internet Explorer, and Chrome, these keys all are the same...

Increase ................ CTRL Scroll Wheel Up; or... CTRL +
Decrease ............... CTRL Scroll Wheel Down; or... CTRL -
Reset to Normal ...... CTRL 0 (zero)

Where the + and - keys are found on the upper row of the QWERTY section of a standard keyboard.

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Last edited by NewsyL; Mar 23, 2011 at 12:19 PM.
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Old Mar 23, 2011, 7:06 PM   #16
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Newsy, you are confusing me with science, what is a video card.

My screen resolution is 1024 x 768, I have tried changing it.

Last edited by Grounded; Mar 23, 2011 at 7:12 PM.
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Old Mar 23, 2011, 8:18 PM   #17
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What windows version are you running? 1024x768 is not going to work correctly with a widescreen monitor such as you are using. How you access the controls, depends on what windows version you have.

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Old Mar 24, 2011, 6:18 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grounded View Post
Newsy, you are confusing me with science, what is a video card.

My screen resolution is 1024 x 768, I have tried changing it.
That's certainly the wrong resolution for that monitor. LCD monitors
are very fussy about resolution. Apart from any issues about aspect
ratio, it will look much better running at the correct resolution.

What options were available when you tried to change it?
You may need to update your video drivers. Is this the original
monitor for this PC? Did it work properly before?
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Old Mar 24, 2011, 7:29 AM   #19
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I am going to make some guesses about what is going on. You are running Win XP on an older computer. You replaced the crt monitor with a widescreen LCD. The graphics card is unable to display the full resolution of the monitor (or it uses graphics built in to the motherboard). You very likely need to upgrade to a new graphics card. Please note, that if this is an older computer, you may not have a PCI-express slot an will need to find a PCI or AGP graphics card.

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Old Mar 24, 2011, 12:07 PM   #20
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It does look like it may be WinXP with that lower left "Start" button doesn't it?

Every PC has to have some kind of graphics chipset to be able to display an image on the attached monitor.

Follow the cable from the back of the monitor to the back of your computer. Where it attaches there is either a card (with a graphics chipset on it aka "video card") mounted in a slot hiding behind the rear facia of the computer, or a wired link to a graphics chipset on the mainboard (aka motherboard) of your computer.

1024x768 is indeed the wrong resolution for the monitor you are using if it is a 16:10 wide screen. Divide 1440 by 900 = 1.6 ... i.e. 16:10 aspect ratio. Divide 1024 by 768 = 1.33333 which is a 4:3 ratio --> divide 4 by 3 = 1.33333. Your old CRT monitor was kind of a squarish rectangle - this is a classic 4:3 aspect ratio monitor.

What you are doing by selecting 1024x768 and forcing it on a widescreen monitor like the BenQ is causing the graphics system of your PC to distort the aspect ratio of the images you display. A circle will look like an oval and a square will look like a rectangle.

Here is an image of a square:
http://www.tc.gc.ca/media/images/marinesafety/noboats.jpg

and a circle:
http://www.tc.gc.ca/media/images/mar...circle_big.jpg

I'm pretty sure that on your monitor you will see a rectangle and an oval.


You need to go into the video/graphics utility and find a 16:10 resolution and use that - preferably the resolution that BenQ states is the native resolution (the largest resolution and resolution at which images will look best) for your monitor. Some of us here think that is 1440x900. I'm not sure because the model number you gave us (ET007b) practically does not exist on the Internet so I can't confirm the specifications of your monitor and believe me.... I have searched.

IF... you can't find a resolution like 1440x900 or 1680x1050 or 1280x800 it probably means that:

a) you have a really really old PC whose video card will simply never support a modern monitor, or
b) you have an old PC whose video card will support the 16:10 resolution BUT you have not updated the video card driver in years. The driver is software that enables the hardware of the graphics chipset to work with various monitors.
c) if you never used the install disc supplied by BenQ with this monitor, you may not have loaded the information into Windows XP that allows it to identify that this is a wide screen 16:10 monitor. If Windows still thinks you still have your old 4:3 CRT attached it will only offer 4:3 resolutions in the utility that allows you to change resolutions.

I'm thinking the issue here is a combination of "b)" and "c)". For reference I used to use a WinXP laptop that I acquired in 2001. It had a 4:3 screen on it but I was able to use it with an external monitor that was 16:10. All I had to do was update the video driver. Is your computer more than 10 years old?


I don't know where else to go with this. If you are unfamiliar with a term like "video card" it is either a language translation issue or you are simply not computer literate. If the last is the case it may be a good idea to find a friend who is a techie or hire a technician to fix this.

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Last edited by NewsyL; Mar 24, 2011 at 12:11 PM.
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