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Old Jun 23, 2011, 10:40 PM   #1
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Default Basic filters

I have UV filters on my lenses and I also have. Circular polarizers. I was reading an article recently where a pro said he has skylight filters always on his lenses. Is this different than a UV filter?

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Old Jun 23, 2011, 11:01 PM   #2
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Yea is a bit different form a UV filter. It will make the sky a bit pink.
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Old Jun 23, 2011, 11:04 PM   #3
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Thank you for the reply. I am blessed to take an 8 day fishing trip each summer off the coast of Baja. We are offshore and the sun is usually very bright and the water extremely blue. Would a skylight filter help? Other filters?
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Old Jun 23, 2011, 11:24 PM   #4
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I am not a fan of sky light filters, as it really cause regular shooting to get off colors. It was really only to do one thing and that is to give you that pink effect. I would stick with the cpl for fishing trip. Use properly it can increase or decrease refection, and make the sky very blue.
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Old Jun 23, 2011, 11:29 PM   #5
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PS
they are very effective in snowy scenes. With so much white and allot of sunlight, you get a nature blue cast in photos. It helps balance out the blue, as it is tinted pink. So you get more of a natural color in snow scenes.
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Old Jun 24, 2011, 6:36 AM   #6
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For what you want to do, you'd be better off with CPLs instead anyway. They'll reduce the glare reflected from the water's surface. They'll knock a stop or two off your exposure settings, but you'll probably have more than enough light anyway.
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Old Jun 24, 2011, 12:45 PM   #7
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CC Filters were very useful in the film days to correct for color cast.
With digital, correct using the white-balance settings. color correcting filters not needed.
Better to get a white balance tool and learn to do custom white balances.
Look up tools like expodisk or whibal or colorchecker. or spydercube.

Myself I use a mix of the datacolor spydercube and a GretagMacbeth® ColorChecker target.

UV filters original task was to reduce ultraviolet light which used to be an issue with film at higher altitudes and a few other places like deserts and snow fields. Almost all digital SLR cameras have a built in filter in front of the sensor that cuts out light in both the IR and UV ranges.
So a UV filter is not really needed for that purpose any longer.
Now they are usually sold as lens protectors, and helps drive up the shops sales .
If you are going to use one make sure it is multi-coated and made of a high end glass, otherwise it can degrade your images.
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Old Jun 25, 2011, 9:05 PM   #8
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It is stupid to leave a polarizing filter on, you lose 2 stops and they are not effective without the sun shining, but a great asset when it is if you use it properly. I use a U V more to protect my lens, I remove it for an important shoot.
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