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Old Jan 11, 2004, 2:02 PM   #1
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Default Camera takes its own photos

I ran into something peculiar the other day. The cable release was connected to my camera and the release was in the "lock" position so pictures couldn't be accidentally taken. When I turned on my camera, it focused and took a picture all by itself. I turned the camera off and on several times, but each time I turned it on, it snapped a picture. Eventually, I took off the cable release and, in the process of doing so, unlocked it. I then reconnected it to the camera, then turned on the camera, which finally behaved itself.

No directions came with the cable release, so I'm hoping one of you uses a release that includes a lock because I'm now suspecting that, the last time I turned off the camera and locked the cable release, I might have accidentally pushed the button while locking it. Would doing this end up locking the cable release with the shutter release down?

Or was my camera temporarily possessed by an evil spirit?
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Old Jan 11, 2004, 4:09 PM   #2
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Barb Is this a generic release? If so sometimes when you screw on the release the threads are to long, or your camera has no stop for the release when you screw it on and when you do it trips the shutter.
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Old Jan 11, 2004, 4:42 PM   #3
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Nope, it's the Olympus release for the Olympus camera. The thing is that it had been on the camera for a couple of weeks, and so nothing about it had changed prior to the other day when the camera started taking photos on its own.
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Old Jan 11, 2004, 7:54 PM   #4
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Barb...I think the lock is used for long term exposures, not as a means to prevent pictures being taken. So, by locking it, you are actually sending the signal to take the picture. At least that's the way it was with my older flim SLR's.
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Old Jan 11, 2004, 9:41 PM   #5
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Default Is this a plunger type release cable....

meaning a cable with a prod on the end that is housed in a sheath with a plunger for your thumb? (just checking to make sure you are not using an electronic device as I am not familiar with your equipment). If this is what you are using, when you used the "lock" did you by chance plunge the plunger and then screw down the lock? if so this might result in what you experienced.
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Old Jan 12, 2004, 6:39 AM   #6
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Quote:
I think the lock is used for long term exposures
Well now, there's a fine reason why it would have been nice to have gotten instructions along with the cable release! The lock doesn't screw down. It's a slide switch, which means it's easier yet to accidentally push the button while sliding the switch, which is about a quarter inch beneath it.

Okay, so now that I know the real reason for the lock, am I right in assuming it's actually an exposure lock?

Quote:
meaning a cable with a prod on the end that is housed in a sheath with a plunger for your thumb? (just checking to make sure you are not using an electronic device as I am not familiar with your equipment).
Yes, that's the item. I also have a digital remote, but it has to be pointed at the front of the camera instead of behind it where I am. If I were taking pictures of myself, I suppose I'd find it handy, but the older I get, the less interested I am in reporting on the unfortunate changes.
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Old Jan 12, 2004, 10:43 AM   #7
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The Nikon remote "cable" release is the electrical type with a pushbutton and lock on it. I find that it is extremely easy to accidently lock it and then have the same problem as you with the camera firing off a shot when turned on. I just make sure it is not locked when I use it.

I also have one of the mechanical cable releases but have never had any trouble with it accidently locking. I used it for many years on a Minolta SRT-101a 35 mm camera. Then I got a Nikon N70 followed by a Nikon F100 which I still have. Both of those use the electrical remote. I have recently purchased a Nikon D100 which uses the mechanical type. If you have the auxiliary battery/grip accessory, you can use an electrical release as well.
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Old Jan 12, 2004, 11:07 AM   #8
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Cal, you've confirmed it. My camera isn't haunted and my cable release isn't psychotic. The owner of these two items just needed an instruction sheet. That's what's wonderful about this forum: there are always members with answers.

Thanks to all for your help.
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Old Jan 12, 2004, 11:27 AM   #9
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Default Remote lock

I just went back and opened the packaging for my RM-CB1 remote cable. The instructions are rather short. How ever it does say that for bulb exposures slide the lock in the direction of the arrow and it will then lock when the shutter botton is fully depressed. It follows this by a warning not to store the camera with the slide in the locked position nor to connect it to the camera when the camera is on. Accidential exposures may occur. Aren't you glad some one saves packageing materials?
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Old Jan 12, 2004, 11:42 AM   #10
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Okay, so I'm freshly back from the Olympus site where their miniscule description of the cable release includes "locks on for bulb exposures." Since your cable release is probably very similar to mine, Cal, how would you go about setting it up for a super long exposure? My camera can be set for up to an 8-minute exposure, so let's say I set it for the full 8 minutes. Then what? Do I switch the lock on, then press the remote's shutter release button, or do I press the button first, then slide the lock on? Yes, yes, I know I could try it both ways to discover how to do it, but it's so much easier to do it the right way first.

Whoops! While I was writing the above, in sailed "Tomsch" with the answer. Thank you so much.
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