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Old Jul 4, 2011, 10:52 AM   #1
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Default Just bought T3i

Hello
I just bought a Canon T3i and I am now looking to fine tune my photo skills. Does anyone know of free training on the web in general digital photography or specifically on the T3i?
Thanks much
Warren
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Old Jul 4, 2011, 10:56 AM   #2
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Try Canon's Learning Station first.
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Old Jul 12, 2011, 8:54 PM   #3
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Go to youtube and type in "photography for beginners" or "photo tips for beginners", etc. There are lots of excellent tutorials to get you started and to build from. Once you've watched a few you can then focus on specific issues that you want assistance with in your photography.

Congrats on the new camera!
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Old Jul 12, 2011, 9:02 PM   #4
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Www.dslrtips.com
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Old Jul 20, 2011, 3:44 AM   #5
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To me the best traing is going out taking pictures you will learn by your successes and failures. Good Luck the T3i is a good camera
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Old Jul 20, 2011, 7:09 AM   #6
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Aside from looking at the learning station on the Canon site, I can think of no more important thing to do than reading your manual. Yea, I know that's boring but, it is the first step in knowing your camera and how it functions.

Best of all, it's free.

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Old Jul 20, 2011, 11:57 AM   #7
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manual? Is that that shrink wrapped thing that is normally used as a coaster or to fix a wobbly table?

Seriously though, many of the link suggestions given so far are good starting points.
Also a visit to a local library can get you some good books to look through on photography.

Or look up and join a local camera club if any are around you.
You can learn a lot from going out to shoot with more established members.
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Last edited by PeterP; Jul 20, 2011 at 12:00 PM.
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Old Jul 25, 2011, 1:36 AM   #8
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I realize I'm replying to a fairly old thread and you may have figured everything out by now... Hopefully you're enjoying your new camera! But, FWIW, I'll throw in my two cents anyway.

When I was first learning photography (with a film camera), I read a tip somewhere that basically said... Keep a notebook and write everything down that you did (aperture, shutter speed, ISO, distance, etc); Bracket all of your photos by one f-stop in either direction (write it down); go through all of the settings, one by one, taking three pictures for each setting (bracketing); take lots of pictures and write them all down. When you get your film developed, analyze it against your notes.

This was excellent advice, because I got to see what each setting did. With the advent of DSLRs, we don't have to wait for our film to be developed; we have instant feedback. It's awesome and I love it!

So, my suggestion to you is to just start going through each setting, one by one and see what they do. Yes, it's time consuming; but it will teach you what you need to know about how to use your camera and get the results that you want.

Take pictures from different perspectives: laying on the floor; standing on a ladder; up close; far away... Browse other people's photo albums on the internet and see what they do; see what inspires you.

I really like http://www.dailyshoot.com/. They give you a different assignment each day; for me, it really does help to get the creative juices flowing. Even if I don't post a photo, it gets me thinking.

HTH!
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Old Jul 26, 2011, 9:11 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JeannieBug View Post
I realize I'm replying to a fairly old thread and you may have figured everything out by now... Hopefully you're enjoying your new camera! But, FWIW, I'll throw in my two cents anyway.

When I was first learning photography (with a film camera), I read a tip somewhere that basically said... Keep a notebook and write everything down that you did (aperture, shutter speed, ISO, distance, etc); Bracket all of your photos by one f-stop in either direction (write it down); go through all of the settings, one by one, taking three pictures for each setting (bracketing); take lots of pictures and write them all down. When you get your film developed, analyze it against your notes.

This was excellent advice, because I got to see what each setting did. With the advent of DSLRs, we don't have to wait for our film to be developed; we have instant feedback. It's awesome and I love it!

So, my suggestion to you is to just start going through each setting, one by one and see what they do. Yes, it's time consuming; but it will teach you what you need to know about how to use your camera and get the results that you want.

Take pictures from different perspectives: laying on the floor; standing on a ladder; up close; far away... Browse other people's photo albums on the internet and see what they do; see what inspires you.

I really like http://www.dailyshoot.com/. They give you a different assignment each day; for me, it really does help to get the creative juices flowing. Even if I don't post a photo, it gets me thinking.

HTH!
Thanks very much for the advice, it is much appreciated and I will do all what was stated. Makes perfect sense.
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Old Jul 30, 2011, 4:27 PM   #10
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I found that our local Art College had a 3 week summer course at night. It was tremendous and worth every cent of the $200 tuition.
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