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Old Jul 19, 2011, 4:06 PM   #1
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Default I don't want blurred background

Recently bought Canon EOS 600D and Canon 55-250IS lens. How do I get a sharp background and foreground? Every picture I took the background are blurred. How to overcome this? Thanks
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Old Jul 19, 2011, 4:27 PM   #2
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if shooting in manual you have to keep your aperture at a higher value say f7 instead of f5 your aperture/zoom/distance from subject all play apart of blurring backrounds
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Old Jul 19, 2011, 4:30 PM   #3
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Take your photos at 55mm, set the aperture to f/11 or f/16, and focus at the hyperfocal distance (see this link for details: http://www.dofmaster.com/hyperfocal.html ).
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Old Jul 19, 2011, 4:35 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anfield View Post
Recently bought Canon EOS 600D and Canon 55-250IS lens. How do I get a sharp background and foreground? Every picture I took the background are blurred. How to overcome this? Thanks
You need greater depth of field. This can be achieved by using a smaller
aperture (higher F number). Use AV (aperture priority) or manual mode
for best control of DOF.

The smaller aperture will allow less light to reach the sensor so that
you will need to use a longer exposure and/or a higher ISO setting.

Good Luck with the new camera.
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Old Jul 19, 2011, 4:44 PM   #5
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stop the aperture to f11, use Av mode.
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Old Jul 19, 2011, 7:39 PM   #6
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anfield,
If you are shooting in auto-mode (your dial is turned to the green box) then your camera is programmed to choose the lowest f-stop number possible. The lower the number, the smaller the depth of field.

I mean no offense, but some new photographers don't understand depth of field. Each camera & lens & distance from camera to the subject and f-stop setting combination determines how far away your subject begins to be in focus and them is in focus then is too far away to be in focus. I learned a lot about depth of field playing around on www.dofmaster.com

So, in order to get more stuff in focus, you need to use a higher number when you're in AV mode or in full manual mode, choosing a higher number will bring a broader range of items in focus.

Again, my apologies if you knew what dof was before I wrote this. No offence was intended.

However, I remember the first time I took the plunge and moved my camera dial off that big green box (full auto). It scared me to death.

Faithfully yours,
FP
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Old Jul 20, 2011, 11:11 AM   #7
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I highly recommend this book to get you going, it is very good and it is inexpensive as well!
Understanding Exposure

One other option not mentioned so far is to reduce your sensor size,
the tiny sensors in point & shoots achieve massive DOF at very wide apertures for the same effective focal lengths.
But that is what you are probably trying to get away from by going to a DSLR,
which is a whole new ball game.
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Old Jul 20, 2011, 9:01 PM   #8
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You can also try turning the mode dial to Landscape (mountain icon) if you prefer to use the auto modes.
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Old Jul 21, 2011, 1:07 PM   #9
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My experience for APS-C sensor DSLR

you have to set the aperture at f/10 or smaller

to ge the same DoF as DC

But then you would have sever lighting problem i.e. underexposure in most situations
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Old Jul 26, 2011, 6:31 AM   #10
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What hasn't been made overly clear is that aperture isn't the only component to depth of field control, you also need to look at the distance from the main subject you are focusing on and the focal length.

To have a wide depth of field, you want to do 1, 2 or all 3 of these.

Get away from the subject, use a short lens, use a narrow (high f number) aperture. With a high aperture then you will likely get a slower shutter speed so be thinking about the use of a tripod.
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