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Old Jul 23, 2011, 1:03 PM   #11
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As TCav mentions, saturation is the key. IIRC, Paint Shop has similar range settings to Photoimpact, which I use. Try increasing saturation to around +25 or so, and possibly about -3 for a hue value.
Another way, is to increase the saturation and contrast values in your camera settings, before you take the shot.
Most point and shoot cameras use higher saturation and contrast as the default settings, where DSLRs are set for more natural colors. We have all gotten so used to the 'punchy' look, that natural settings look dull to us. The difference is similar to color slide film vs. color print film. The over saturated slide film was preferred by a lot of people.
A few years ago, tried an experiment regarding this. I had color matched a print to the subject, so a second photo taken of the subject next to the print showed exactly the same colors. I made another print with the saturation increased about 35%, and showed the two prints to quite a number of people. They all preferred the saturated colors, and most said the first print looked "washed out", even though it perfectly matched the original subject. Needless to say, I gave in a now produce colors tha "pop".

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Old Jul 23, 2011, 3:57 PM   #12
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Ok thanks guys. Some good tips here.

I do have DPP, however I wasn't able to do much with it. Doesn't seem like a typical photo editing program to me.

I boosted the saturation in camera and took a bunch of photos with various lighting. The most colorful of my shots turns out to be from harsh direct sun. Now I'm probably a bit too saturated, I think I'm three ticks to the right.

While this isn't the greatest shot at least there is some rich color.

I want to experiment more with RAW but I think I'm going to need a new photo program (Paint Shop Pro X isn't cutting it). I've been reading a lot about Lightroom 3. Seems nice.

John
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Old Jul 23, 2011, 4:28 PM   #13
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Hi John. I use Photoshop Elements 4.0, which dates back to 2006 for me, but it still serves me well for the limited amount of PP I do. I think your tomato shot looks delicious. Great. The donut with sprinkles looked flat to me, so I did a levels adjustment, and a tiny bit of saturation increase. My granddaughtr Bella LOVES those donuts!
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Old Jul 23, 2011, 5:04 PM   #14
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Yeah you made my donut look how I would have wanted it to look!

Nice!

This means that I need a lesson in good post processing. I think I should buy a new more modern program and get a good book to teach me how to use it.
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Old Jul 23, 2011, 5:54 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnandscooter View Post
I've been reading a lot about Lightroom 3. Seems nice.

John
Lightroom if not a full editing program. But it does a lot for RAW processing. It also has a built in tether function if you camera is supported.
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Old Jul 23, 2011, 7:05 PM   #16
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Lightroom, as well as Photoshop and Photoshop Elements, are available as trial downloads from here: http://www.adobe.com/downloads/

The same is also true of the new version of PaintShop Photo Pro X3

BTW, Canon only has updates to Digital Photo Professional available for download. You need to install the original version from the CD that came with your camera. Otherwise, the updates won't install.
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Old Jul 24, 2011, 3:54 PM   #17
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Quote:
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Lightroom if not a full editing program. But it does a lot for RAW processing. It also has a built in tether function if you camera is supported.
Thought LR3 is not as editing intense as photoshop. LR3 has a ton of editing features. It took me a while to play around with it, but it can do most the things photoshop can do, but since it is a different platform, it just does it differently form photoshop. There is only couple of things that LR3 can not match the 700 dollar photoshop in.
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Old Jul 25, 2011, 12:48 AM   #18
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I love Photoshop; I use it all the time to crop and resize. But, I prefer to try to achieve my results, within my camera.

Professional photographers use EXCELLENT light sources (even if they're homemade from paper towels, aluminum foil and duct tape - yeah, I've done it because I'm not a pro and can't afford anything else LOL). I really do believe that lighting is the key.

Maybe you can find a site that gives you a behind-the-scenes look at a food photo shoot? Or perhaps a how-to? I'll bet that you'll find that they use all kinds of different lighting set-ups. Perhaps you can ask the food blogger that you admire how they get their shots?

In my humble opinion, your photos are too dark. If you look at the lighting on the first photo that you posted, it is bright and warm. It's the light...
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Old Jul 25, 2011, 10:43 AM   #19
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Youtube food photography lots of videos to view.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7X802j2EpPo

Some of the dirty tricks used by food stylists for food photography
http://www.pixiq.com/article/food-photo-tricks

Enjoy
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Old Jul 25, 2011, 2:55 PM   #20
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http://blog.discover.sonystyle.com/h...-food-pictures
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