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Old Jan 24, 2004, 3:08 PM   #11
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I don't see anywhere in the article anything about the tens of thousnads in the US that will loose their jobs because of this! Of course Wall Street likes this!

Just who does make Kodaks digital cameras since Kodak makes film NOT cameras??
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Old Jan 24, 2004, 11:41 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by digcamfan
But, many, many folks will always want their 4 x 6 Prints on photo paper
...and they'll be the only folk still able to show them to their grandchildren when all our inkjet prints have long disappeared and Windows XYZ2050 won't read our antique CD-R archives. The photoprints will have faded as well by the time of the great-grandchildren, unless they're expensive hand-made old-fashioned black&white prints.
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Old Feb 12, 2004, 2:37 PM   #13
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Default Who said Kodak days are numbered?

Quote:
ROCHESTER, New York (AP) -- Eastman Kodak Co., which sold more digital cameras in the United States during the end-of-year holiday season that any of its Japanese rivals, introduced six new camera models Thursday in hopes of surpassing top-ranked Sony Corp. this year.

... Kodak jumped ahead of Sony, the No. 1 U.S. seller of digital cameras for the past five years, in both November and December, market researchers say. "It is our goal to move into the No. 1 position in 2004," said Nancy Carr, Kodak's director of worldwide consumer advertising.
http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/040212/na_fi...cameras_2.html

FYI: Kodak bought Chinon just recently... their digital cameras manufacturer!
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Old Feb 12, 2004, 3:57 PM   #14
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I like the black camera in the photo. When will it be available so I can buy one?

Quote:
...and they'll be the only folk still able to show them to their grandchildren when all our inkjet prints have long disappeared and Windows XYZ2050 won't read our antique CD-R archives. The photoprints will have faded as well by the time of the great-grandchildren, unless they're expensive hand-made old-fashioned black&white prints.
CDs are standard and will be in computers for over 20 years IMO considering DVD players will read them. Look how long the useless floppy drives have persisted. There will be plenty of time to transfer the images to the new tetrabyte holographic memories.

I do fear that many people will not guard their images carefully enough and they will be lost to future generations, but it doesn’t have to be that way for people who care about their images.
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Old Feb 12, 2004, 5:25 PM   #15
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Compared to the time that film has been around in very much the same format, digital imaging is just on the learning curve!

Any product which requires a significant amount of technology to 'decode' the original information will suffer from obsolescence. All you need from a print or slide are your eyes or a pretty simple projector. All the areas in the digital photography value chain are susceptible to rapid outdating, since they work on ever changing formats and changing complex standards, many of which have assigned intellectual property rights. These standards are not worldly compatible either. Sitting in front of a pc it's easy to think they must be everywhere - which they aren't. Same with email. There are plenty of places where 'physical' communication is still the most effective and reliable.

Despite what we might think, backwards compatibility only seems to exist over a short time span. I've got some 51/4 discs which ran under CPM, even the odd Sinclair original 'microdrive'. Unless I kept the kit in working order or transferred the data to something that would emulate the OS in every respect (unlikely since ouput and input devices are re specified) I doubt I could run anything now. Legacy gamers must be finding the same thing.

I still think it's good insurance to get real photo prints done for the most memorable events, to make sure you are always testing new systems for readability of your archive data and can always move and use your pics if you alter your 'decoding system' - PC, monitor/printer. Formats for analogue and now digital video recorders have changed dramatically over a pretty short time frame - compared to movie film cameras. VHS will become pretty dead soon, as more hard disc recorders come along and streaming compressed digital - possibly to tape for mass archive storage, takes over. VOX
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Old Feb 13, 2004, 1:31 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slipe
I do fear that many people will not guard their images carefully enough and they will be lost to future generations, but it doesn’t have to be that way for people who care about their images.
Sadly, this commitment has to last for more than one generation to be useful. Monochrome prints in a cardboard box in the attic last for centuries, and don't need active management, beyond moving the box into each successive generation's attic. Transfer of Daddy's photos to the latest generation of solid state memory isn't very likely to happen.
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