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Old Aug 1, 2011, 1:39 AM   #1
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Default Sharpening Digital Photo's & Editing Problems

Hellow fellow photographers

Any of you out there who shot for publication can relate to what its like to deal with your editor(s). Here's the problem Im having, after I resize the photos for submission most all of them are a little blured (this is normal) some resharpen perfect with just one or two hits from the sharpen scale while others sharpen to a point but are still a little blured when I try to bring them into focus with one more hit they jump to being over sharpened, there's no point where I can get them to focus just right, there eather a little blured or to sharp. My editor sent me this e-mail about the problem , "In reguards to the rejected photo's it depends upon the angle that the lines are running through the pictures those that have lines running mostly horiziontal and vertical can be sharpened much better than those that have the lines running at an angle". I sent back a few basic questions about this but didnt get a response, Im at a loss here as to what can be done about this, its the first time Ive heard of this but it makes sense if I was shotting with differnt cameras and lenes. All my photos are shot with the same camera and lens a Nikon D90 with a Nikon ED 28-200mm G model lens and I use Ifranview for my photo softwere. Why some photos have lines running one way and other photos have lines running at a differnt angle and cant be focused all the way is a mystery to me. Ive read the D90 manual theres nonthing in there that addresses or mentions this problem, I have shot in all image formats JPEG basic, normal, fine, NEF(RAW) ect none of this makes any difference. Have any of you heard of or have had to deal with this at all. Is there a way to control the angle of lines in a photo or correct them.

Thanks for all the help. John
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Old Aug 1, 2011, 7:41 AM   #2
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The way that "Sharpening" works is that it simply increases the contrast in high contrast portions of the image. (See Digital Unsharp Masking.) It doesn't actually sharpen anything.

The process can result in oversharpening artifacts. Those artifacts appear equally for portions of the image where the boundries are horizontal, vertical, or diagonal. I think your editor has sent you on a wild goose chase.
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Old Aug 1, 2011, 7:43 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by monty20072 View Post
Hellow fellow photographers

Any of you out there who shot for publication can relate to what its like to deal with your editor(s). Here's the problem Im having, after I resize the photos for submission most all of them are a little blured (this is normal).....
Welcome to the forum John,

Resizing images is always tricky. Does Ifranview offer more than one
method of re-scaling? The best methods are not always used by
default because they are relatively slow.
http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tut...erpolation.htm

You will find that the degree of sharpening required will depend
on many factors.

Content of photo.

The sharpening method used. Sharpen tool or unsharp mask.

JPEG images from the camera are usually sharper than
RAW. They may need little or no extra sharpening.

Photo resolution. At lower resolution, sharpening will be more
obvious.

As you mentioned, sharpening or re-scaling diagonal lines is
always difficult.

Different editors will have different policies, but I find that most
of them prefer to get the highest possible resolution, even if this
means sending multi-megabyte image files as e-mail attachements.
This gives them greater flexibility when it comes to scaling or
cropping the image to suit the page layout.

The D90 takes 12MP images. Do you scale or crop the
image by much before you submit it for publication? Can you
post one of the rejected images?

Differences in monitor calibration, size, resolution and quality
will also affect the appearance of an on-screen image. The image
seen by your editor may look different to the one on your screen.
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Old Aug 1, 2011, 9:34 AM   #4
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What you need is a better photo editor. PhotoShop Elements 9.0, is everything that PhotoShop a couple of years ago was, in other words it is vastly improved over its predecessors.

It now will work with layers, and has a sharpening program called "Adjust Sharpness" it is a de-convolution filter, instead of the usual contrast type of sharpening. Its not in the regular "Filters" menu, but in the "Image" tab.

Elements 9.0 comes in just the basic still image editor, and a version called Elements 9.0 Plus. This is a still plus Video editor, if you don't need the vedio editing save yourself some money, and just but the basic Elements 9.0. The difference is about 40-50 bucks. I got Elements 9.0, at Best Buy on sale for $79.95.

PS: it also offers several re-scaling options, and does a very good job, and clean! might I add - of resizing.
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Old Aug 1, 2011, 9:42 AM   #5
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Part of the difficulty can be the software the publisher uses, and the type of output. The requirements are going to be different for newspapers than for glossy magazines.
For best results, I would recommend (for Irfanview) making sure you have the resample box checked in the resize/resample dialog box, and select Lanczos(slowest), as the resample algorithm.
The sharpening used in Irfanview is a very basic type, and I would instead, opt for a sharpening plugin, such as Topaz Infocus (pricey, but very good), or search photo freeware.net for others. Most any thing with user adjustments will be better than the fixed sharpening done by Irfanview.

brian
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Old Aug 1, 2011, 10:12 AM   #6
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Quote:
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It now will work with layers, and has a sharpening program called "Adjust Sharpness" it is a convolution filter, instead of the usual contrast type of sharpening.
Just a small terminological point -- virtually every filter is a convolution except those that use a selection kernel (median filters and the like). The most common "sharpening" filter is an unsharp mask, which is a pretty foul approach mathematically, but can look quite good if applied sparingly.

The kind of convolutions that work better than this are usually something along the lines of a Weiner filter (aka an optimal filter), which basically is a two-stage filter that passes high frequency data at a different rate than low-frequency data. If you look at it in the frequency domain, it looks like a low-pass filter with a hump. In the spatial domain, it is often called a "hat" filter. The trick is to define the location of the hump, or the size of the hat, to fit the noise profile of the image. FWIW
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Old Aug 1, 2011, 10:48 AM   #7
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The "Adjust Sharpness" filter in Elements 9.0, is far better than the usual un-sharp mask. It offers both compensation for motion blur, and lens blur. I have used both, and Adjust Sharpness can go to a point sharper, without the usual ghosting un-sharp mask produces; when you drive it to the wall.
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Old Aug 2, 2011, 4:31 AM   #8
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Many Thanks to everyone for the help. Note: I forgot to point out that when the photos are made into prints from the CD they come great, its in the reworking them on the computer that the focusing (sharping) becomes an issue.

John
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Old Aug 2, 2011, 4:44 AM   #9
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Hi it might help if you could post a couple of examples. You could also try another editor, Photoshop Elements 9 is really good but the Gimp is free and also very good
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Old Aug 2, 2011, 7:16 AM   #10
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If and when you post examples, please post 100% crops instead of reduced versions of your full size images. (See Why a resized photo is no use in showing camera)
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