Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jan 17, 2004, 9:13 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
photosbyvito's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 5,710
Default

holy cow! 45 bucks for a couple pieces of paper?! wat makes them so special? just the color?
photosbyvito is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2004, 10:11 PM   #22
Senior Member
 
bradg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 819
Default

they have a major companys name on them
bradg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2004, 10:12 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
bradg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 819
Default

well, i've never heard of them, but they sound kinda' big
bradg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 20, 2004, 8:54 AM   #24
Senior Member
 
Bob Nichol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Eastern Ontario Canada
Posts: 822
Default

I've been using a square piece of white vinyl vertical window blind with excellent results. It's very white and moisture proof! Just the right size to tuck in a shirt pocket..
Bob Nichol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 20, 2004, 9:27 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
BillDrew's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Hay River Township, WI
Posts: 2,512
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by photosbyvito
holy cow! 45 bucks for a couple pieces of paper?! wat makes them so special? just the color?
Yup, just the color. Reproducable, consistant color. Same color if you buy another set after the dog eats the ones you have.

IMHO, those are left over from film where shooting 4x5" chrome costs a couple of bucks each, and any format takes a fair amount of time to process. $45 can easily be repaid if it saves a few hours. Using something like a white vinyl vertical window blind as your reference will work well with digital, though you should keep an eye on how it changes with time and be carefull if you need to replace it

I'd suggest experimenting with various "white" sheets until you find something that suits your own preferences. Then take a close look at the results of shooting that "white" sheet to see what the RGB values are straight out of the camera while using a preset white balance in light you can easily duplicate. (The absolute values don't really matter, but the ratios do.) That way if you ever need to replace your reference card, it will be easier to do.

I like using a gray card for white balance since it can also be used to set exposure - one less thing to carry.
BillDrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 20, 2004, 3:40 PM   #26
NHL
Senior Member
 
NHL's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: 39.18776, -77.311353333333
Posts: 11,545
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BillDrew
I like using a gray card for white balance since it can also be used to set exposure - one less thing to carry.
My genuine Kodak 18% gray card is white on the backside, i.e. just flip it over (still 1 card)! :lol: :lol: :lol:

http://www.betterlight.com/pdf/white...gray_cards.pdf
NHL is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:01 PM.