Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jan 16, 2004, 8:15 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
aladyforty's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 6,964
Default How do you .....

calibrate your computer screen to your printer so that the photos you print out look the same color wise as on the screen.
aladyforty is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jan 16, 2004, 8:59 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
ohenry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,676
Default

You calibrate your monitor either by eye using a program like Adobe Gamma (which is free) or by using a color calibration device such as ColorVision Spyder (which is what I use). This profile is then set as the default color profile in Windows or Mac. Then you set your printer to a known profile using ICC profiles that are either supplied by companies or produced by yourself with a calibration device. These profiles will differ depending on which paper you are using so you will need a profile for each type of paper you have. The monitor profile works automatically with your OS. When coupled with a good ICC profile, in theory, the output to your printer should match your monitor when you are using a color profile aware program to print, such as Adobe Photoshop.

There is a lot more to it than I have just described, but it is also well beyond my ability to discuss simply . You can do a search for "color management" and get more information.
ohenry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2004, 6:43 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 386
Default

Also good to know; high end proffessional monitors and printers are hard to calibrate to match exact. With lesser stuff it can be impossible. However the exercise of tweaking monitor close to printer output will help to calibrate your own mind. At the end that is your best color translation centre. (for instance you see something almost mid blue at screen and know it will become jeans blue in print)
Mathilde uP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2004, 9:44 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,652
Default

Quote:
Then you set your printer to a known profile using ICC profiles that are either supplied by companies or produced by yourself with a calibration device.
Is there any way of writing your own ICC profiles, or is this essentially what I'm doing when I use my Epson 1270's advanced features where I create a custom setting for a specific paper (after much testing)?
bcoultry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2004, 10:48 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
ohenry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,676
Default

There is a way to do that Barbara, but I am not familiar enough with the process to even begin to comment. I'm fortunate in that I use Red River papers and they provide profiles that give me excellent results with my Canon. They also provide Epson profiles. What paper are you using? Have you checked to see if there are profiles already available for your paper and printer combination? I sure beats the trial and error method of wasting paper
ohenry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2004, 11:45 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,652
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ohenry
What paper are you using? Have you checked to see if there are profiles already available for your paper and printer combination? I sure beats the trial and error method of wasting paper
Normally, I use Epson paper since it's the easy way out, but I received a gift of two types of Kodak paper which has given me fits in spite of the fact that, though they don't supply profiles, they do give detailed settings for my printer...which don't work all that well.

Even though you have profiles for the paper you use, did you find you still had to do a bit of your own tweaking?

I've gotten very Scrooge-like with paper tests, reducing photos enough in size to fit four versions on a page. In a froth of penny pinching, I tried for more than four, but what looks good at 2 inches high doesn't necessarily look so good at 10 inches.

One of these days, I'm going to spring for calibration equipment...maybe after I finally get that long lens no one gave me for Christmas. :evil:
bcoultry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2004, 5:53 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
ohenry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,676
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bcoultry

Even though you have profiles for the paper you use, did you find you still had to do a bit of your own tweaking?
No, I get VERY good results. And after springing for the Spyder calibration for my monitor they're almost dead on. I'm impressed.

Actually, if you do any tweaking to your printer, you would have to turn off Photoshop's color output control to allow the printer to control color, wouldn't you?

Anyway, I've heard similar findings about using Kodak with the Epson printers. Not having an Epson, I will reserve comment. Others? Kodak worked fine on my HP, and so-so on my Canon but I don't have profiles for Kodak and have to depend on the settings as you are doing.
ohenry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jan 17, 2004, 7:23 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 3,652
Default

Quote:
Actually, if you do any tweaking to your printer, you would have to turn off Photoshop's color output control to allow the printer to control color, wouldn't you?
You don't exactly turn off Photoshop control when you print, not if you think about it. Your ICC profiles sit between Photoshop and your printer just the same as the advanced settings do in my Epson software. That's why I suspect that those Epson settings are very much like the profiles. I can set dpi, gamma, brightness, contrast, saturation, amounts of CMY, and some other stuff not immediately coming to mind because I just ate dinner and there's no blood in my brain.

Quote:
Kodak worked fine on my HP
It worked very well on the HP I had, too.

I'm going to look into Red River paper.
bcoultry is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 7:47 PM.