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Old Aug 30, 2011, 2:30 AM   #1
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Default 10 Stop ND filter.

I am thinking of buying a 10 Stop (ND3.0-1000x) filter to take pictures with very high exposure of the ocean during daylight to get good blur effect. Could someone please recommed to me the best place to buy ?I would not mind a slightly used one too since this is not something I will using it everyday. Which make is a good one?

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Old Aug 30, 2011, 3:28 AM   #2
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Neutral Density filters are not tremendously popular, so finding used ones might be tough. KEH has some in a variety of sizes as does Adorama. Remember that ND filters can be stacked for a cumulative effect, so if you can't find a10 stop filter, for example, you can use two 5 stop filters. That is, if you can handle the vignetting.

But remember that the more optical elements you add to the light path, the lower your image quality will be.
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Old Aug 30, 2011, 6:50 AM   #3
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This should solve the problem of optical stacking:
http://www.singh-ray.com/varind.html
-> I use them to shoot streams in forest; However unless you use the thin ring version, they tend to vignette on WA (although much less than stacking standard ND filters on top of one another)


You can even do 3 things at once:
http://www.singh-ray.com/varintrio.html

... and for extreme use - turning day into night:
http://www.singh-ray.com/morslo.html
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Last edited by NHL; Aug 30, 2011 at 7:00 AM.
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Old Aug 30, 2011, 7:10 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NHL View Post
This should solve the problem of optical stacking:
http://www.singh-ray.com/varind.html
-> I use them to shoot streams in forest; However unless you use the thin ring version, they tend to vignette on WA (although much less than stacking standard ND filters on top of one another)


You can even do 3 things at once:
http://www.singh-ray.com/varintrio.html

... and for extreme use - turning day into night:
http://www.singh-ray.com/morslo.html
Thank you for your quick reply. My lens ring size is 72mm whereas this filter is available only in 77mm. How do i go about it ?

2. Since this is a black filter auto focus will not work. It has do be done in manual mode and then fix the filter or turn the ring to make it dark. Dose it not go out of fucus if you touch the ring after the focus is set ?? This is a very tricky thing. I understand that is the reason people use square filters so that after the focus is set you just need to slide the filter in the slot. Please comment.
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Canon Lens 18-55mm
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Sigma 105mm f2.8 EX Macro
Tokina 11-16mm f2.8 Wide angle
Website:www.hussainnalwala-photography.com

Last edited by hanalwala; Aug 30, 2011 at 7:12 AM.
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Old Aug 30, 2011, 7:23 AM   #5
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Actually, focusing on the ocean will be tough for any AF system, with or without an ND filter. You should get the focus you want, then switch to MF, and mount the filter(s).

You can use the Cokin (square) filters, but the're no real advantage for what you want to do.
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Old Aug 30, 2011, 8:41 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hanalwala View Post
Thank you for your quick reply. My lens ring size is 72mm whereas this filter is available only in 77mm. How do i go about it ?
You can use a step-up ring...



Quote:
Originally Posted by hanalwala View Post
2. Since this is a black filter auto focus will not work. It has do be done in manual mode and then fix the filter or turn the ring to make it dark. Dose it not go out of fucus if you touch the ring after the focus is set ?? This is a very tricky thing. I understand that is the reason people use square filters so that after the focus is set you just need to slide the filter in the slot. Please comment.
If you have a lens with the front element rotating then tough luck.
Most high-end lens have a separate focus ring which do not rotate the front of the lens, so you're OK there. The good thing about the Singh-Ray is its density can be lowered to focus then 'blacken' back again.
-> For landscape you do not need AF, use the hyperfocal distance. You can't really go wrong: http://www.dofmaster.com/hyperfocal.html
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Last edited by NHL; Aug 30, 2011 at 8:44 AM.
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Old Aug 30, 2011, 8:55 AM   #7
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If you don't want to use a step-up ring, a solution which has been used for a long time, is to stack polarizing filters. You don't need to use both circular polarizers - one circular polarizer, mounted to the lens, with a linear polarizer mounted to it, will work just as well. These should be easier to find in a variety of sizes. If you already have a CPL, then adding the linear polarizer is very inexpensive.

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Old Aug 31, 2011, 8:17 AM   #8
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B+W makes a couple of 10 stop filters in 72mm size,
here is the multi-coated one at B&H
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...d_Neutral.html

Lee makes a square 4"*4" 10 stop called the Big Stopper
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...4_x_4_Big.html

I prefer this one as you can focus your lens then slide the filter into place, it can also be used with split ND filters if you really want to knock the sky down more.
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Old Aug 31, 2011, 4:30 PM   #9
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G'day all

@VT/Brian ~ while stacking pola filters seems very possible, regrettably it's not without its problems ... it's well known to cause colour shifts from minor to major depending upon both lighting & sensor type

These long exposures are of the ocean waves breaking over rocks on the foreshore
eg-

and

Regards, Phil
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Old Aug 31, 2011, 7:26 PM   #10
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Phil;
You are quite right. This is due to the nature of the filter allowing more of the shorter wavelengths to pass. Generally gives a violet tint. Digital sensors can be a bit odd when dealing with violet, considering it a combination of red and blue. Usually, it is a one-click fix with a photo editor, though.

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