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Old Sep 19, 2011, 8:37 PM   #1
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Hi there

I have two cameras and about six lenses, which I frequently interchange on both cameras.

I recently discovered a florid spider pattern on the circumference of the front element on my workhorse lens, which was attached to one of my cameras.

I am removing the camera and lens from my kit, giving it away to a friend who has no SLR (explaining the situation, of course).

I have exposed the lens and the camera for a few hours each day for two days, and have wiped the exposed interior of the camera and the back of the lens with canesteen anti fungal laundry additive.

A few questions
  1. If the web doesn’t go away, how do I know the fungus is dead? Does it look different to live fungus?
  2. What does fungus look like on the camera?
  3. How long should I quarantine the rest of my gear.

Thanks all.
Rachael

Last edited by rlddg; Sep 19, 2011 at 10:21 PM. Reason: Ambiguous title
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Old Sep 20, 2011, 6:46 AM   #2
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Hey Racheal.

I'll move this post down to our General Forum for you, where it will be noticed by more members.

Good Luck with the Fugus problem, and Welcome to Steve's
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Old Sep 20, 2011, 7:06 AM   #3
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Sorry I can't give any help but will be very interested to see what others have to say about this fungus problem.
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Old Sep 20, 2011, 7:51 AM   #4
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Fungus dies in direct sunlight. Just leaving it exposed to indoor lighting, or even sunlight that passes through window glass, won't help much.

Once fungus shows up, killing it won't restore the lens to it's original condition. For the most part, what you're seeing isn't the fungus, but the damage it has already done. The only sure way to know it's dead is if the damage doesn't get any worse.

If it doesn't affect image quality, don't worry about it. And if it does, there isn't much you can do.

The lens may be a goner, but there's no reason to be worried about the body. I suggest you get some of those Silica Gel packs, and place them in your camera bag and anywhere else you keep your gear.
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Old Sep 20, 2011, 2:12 PM   #5
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If window glass will prevent sunlight from killing the fungus, then surely the lens glass, and coatings will do the same, as fungus grows on the internal elements. If it was on the outside, you could wipe it off with lens cleaner.
My experience has been that the fungus does not harm the lens coatings or the glass, and can be cleaned of quite easily, if you are able to disassemble the lens. I have done this with one Tamron lens which was quite unusable and is now pristine. Lenses and coatings are inorganic, and fungus cannot live on them. The oils and greases used to lubricate the moving parts tend to evaporate (slowly) and the vapors can deposit on lens surfaces. When these vapors combine with moisture, they create a food source for the fungi. I would guess that the lens would start to lose some sharpness before the fungus ever became visible, but don't have enough experience with it to know for sure. If the lens is worth it to you, you could have it cleaned/repaired.

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Old Sep 20, 2011, 8:27 PM   #6
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Thanks guys.

I've already promised the camera, so I am nervous about dismantling the infected lens for fear of destroying it. Would hate to disappoint my friend.

I do however have a cute Tamron 90 going back to my uni days (film version, surprisingly sharp), which if it turns out to be infected might be worth tampering with.

I am storing everything separately at the moment. My plan is to continue sunning each piece when I can and keep an eye out for any funky action in the next month or so.

Cheers
Rach
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Old Sep 21, 2011, 5:14 AM   #7
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Get some silica gel packs to reduce the threat to your other gear. Most photographic retailers sell them.
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