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Old Jan 9, 2012, 10:14 AM   #21
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  • Are you shooting digital (or film for that matter) ?
Then you are manipulating three dimensional reality right off the bat to record it in two dimensions..

  • Are you shooting jpg?
Then your camera is already performing a ton of post processing (using whatever settings you have selected) just to create the jpg image on your flash card.

  • Or are you shooting RAW?
they you need to convert and process that raw file into something that can be used yourself. With about a million options in the raw converter that can alter that file as it is being converted.

  • Are you selecting various focal lengths
Every one of them distorts the original image and alters what was really there

  • same goes for selecting apertures, shutter speeds, and setting a white balance.
  • Are you shooting a scene with a dynamic range outside your cameras small limited range that it is able to record.
Then which portions you select to be within visible, (not blown out/blocked up) range on your final image drastically affect what was there in the real world.

  • As does converting to a 32 bit radiant file, 16 bit tiff or an 8 bit jpg,
Each has a very different capability of what portion of your image remains and how it is displayed

  • Are you trying HDR?

The reality is no matter how much or little post processing you think you are doing
you are doing a rather large amount just by snapping the image in the first place, and the way the camera records it to its medium may not be the way you saw it.
That is where the real post processing comes in, tweaking the output file into the scene as you saw it.

You may also be surprised that this to post or not to post process argument is rather old, almost as old as photography itself. There were always those snap-shooters that wanted to not alter the image after it was taken just use the contact prints, then there were the masters like the previously mentioned Ansel Addams that did major darkroom work on each image to create their final masterpieces. And there are people at every level between those two.

In the end only you can decide which camp you want to be in and how much work you wish to do on each file to create your images.
But don't decry others for having a different view, everyone's opinion and approach to their photography is just as valid as everyone else's.
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Last edited by PeterP; Jan 9, 2012 at 10:35 AM.
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Old Jan 9, 2012, 11:59 AM   #22
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Focal length, shutter speed, aperture, and film (or sensor) speed, are not post-processes, they are photography.
Adjusting, exposure, WB, etc. after the fact, and altering image elements, are post-processing, which is what the OP was talking about.
To my way of thinking, as long as you create an image from a camera, which depicts what you have seen, without including something that wasn't there, it is OK to call it a photograph.

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Old Jan 9, 2012, 4:26 PM   #23
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Aperture might be off that list if the Lytro system takes off someday
Focus / dof done in computer after the image taking .
Lytro
Quote:
Originally Posted by VTphotog View Post
Focal length, shutter speed, aperture, and film (or sensor) speed, are not post-processes, they are photography.
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Old Jan 9, 2012, 8:09 PM   #24
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It's all very interesting hearing where people stand, there's no need to get all defensive.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TCav View Post
The question is "What is Photography to you?"

Nobody is saying you shouldn't feel free to express yourself creatively with the canvas that is a photograph, but at some point the result stops being a "photograph". Photography is the recording of light. You can play with the recording, but when you start replacing the recorded data with your own, you start chipping away at the "photograph", and filling in the gaps with digital graphics.
We share the same views cav, shame some people feel the need to impose their own views onto others.

To me, ultimately, I'd like to think that photography is the equivalent of saying to a friend, "look over there, isn't that beautiful?".
It's not the same saying "look over there, now imagine the sky a bit bluer and the clouds a bit whiter..."

One of the most magical things about photography (I'm sure most would agree) is that you are able to look back on these photographs in the future and see what the present was like. Now imagine a photo from the early 1900s, how would you feel if you find out that the photo was heavily tampered with? It loses it's magic.

Of course this is all my own personal opinion and I do enjoy hearing yours.
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Old Jan 9, 2012, 8:16 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VTphotog View Post
Focal length, shutter speed, aperture, and film (or sensor) speed, are not post-processes, they are photography.
Adjusting, exposure, WB, etc. after the fact, and altering image elements, are post-processing, which is what the OP was talking about.
To my way of thinking, as long as you create an image from a camera, which depicts what you have seen, without including something that wasn't there, it is OK to call it a photograph.

brian
Thanks Brian, I think that's a good clear distinction between the 2 camps. I guess the inbuilt processes is part of the technology available to us at this moment in time. we capture 2D photography, the future may be capturing 3D as the norm. Just like how our photographs are in colour now, but black and white in the old days.

It's another thing that photography is capturing.
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Old Jan 9, 2012, 10:27 PM   #26
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Interesting that you say there are two camps here regarding your question. Frankly, I don't see any. Everyone who has taken the time to respond to your post has answered honestly. Maybe not agreeing with you. But, honestly, none the less.

And as for your statement that "it's a shame that some feel they have to impose their views onto others". Again, no one is imposing their views or anything else for that matter. You asked a question, you got a lot of responses.


And no, I'm not being defensive. If anything, I find your's is a rather curious position.
On the one hand you say not to post process a photograph; or as you stated making the sky bluer or the clouds whiter. But just a couple of week ago, you recommended to Mr. Martin Adaway that he should become a friend of Photoshop. You further went on to say that Martin could post process any of the artificial aspects of a photograph to bring it up to an acceptable level.

hmmmm
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Old Jan 10, 2012, 8:59 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrderek View Post
We share the same views cav, shame some people feel the need to impose their own views onto others.
<snip>
Of course this is all my own personal opinion and I do enjoy hearing yours.
I find your post very odd. You began by asking people what photography was to them. People answered what it was to them, and you first say that they are imposing their views on others by doing so, and then go on to do what you consider to be shameful imposition of views when others do it. Bizarre.
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Old Jan 10, 2012, 2:07 PM   #28
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Heck, we're all friends here. Communication by text tends to come across harsher than we intend. Let's move on in peace.

Besides, we all know that once the camera converts the image out of binary code its no longer a photograph, lol.
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Old Jan 12, 2012, 12:07 AM   #29
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In my opinion until you add any kind of brushes to photos (like removing wrinkles) , its photography.
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Old Jan 12, 2012, 4:29 AM   #30
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Hi all just to add my bit and I think its been said before. In the days of film we processed a roll of film and we ended up with negatives, which were then processed on to paper in a dark room. during this process we dodged and burned and used multiple negatives.
Today we take a picture and down load it on to a computer we can dodge, burn and add layers. We are doing nothing new, its all been done before and like a lot of things techniqes have been improved and added to it doesnt make them wrong and we have the choice to use them or not.
Thats what makes photography interesting. I learn everyday and I hope i will for a long time yet
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