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Old Jan 20, 2012, 5:13 PM   #1
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Default "Pro body" defined

For years I've been under the impression that the term "pro body" refers to a high end camera with a built-in portrait grip (e.g. Nikon's D2/D3/D4, Canon's 1D series). Big. Heavy. Correct? A "consumer body" being the body style w/o a built-in portrait grip. I'm asking because in another forum some one disagreed.

Perhaps he was debating which models should be considered "professional". Which is different from debating whether a camera body design can be labelled as either a "pro body" or "consumer".
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Old Jan 20, 2012, 5:23 PM   #2
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A "Pro Body" can mean a lot of different things, but mostly it means a body that makes it easier for a professional do work, and that can stand up to the rigors of professional use. This can be something as simple as two memory card slots, or as complex as the durability of the materials and construction of the camera body. For instance, metal is better than plastic.

It doesn't necessarily mean a built-in vertical grip, but an optional vertical grip would certainly be a professional accessory. Professionals would probably be more interested in a camera body that could accept a vertical grip, not so much for the ease of use in the portrait orientation, but for the extra battery life the second battery would provide.
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Old Jan 20, 2012, 8:10 PM   #3
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I was using the term "pro body" to refer to cameras like the 1D-X and D4. To differentiate them from cameras like the upcoming D800 and 5D3 which have "consumer" camera bodies.

Several years ago companies like Nikon and Canon used to separate models (as you probably recall) into consumer, prosumer and professional. Not any more.
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Old Jan 20, 2012, 8:36 PM   #4
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A "Pro Body" can mean a lot of different things, but mostly it means a body that makes it easier for a professional do work, and that can stand up to the rigors of professional use. This can be something as simple as two memory card slots, or as complex as the durability of the materials and construction of the camera body. For instance, metal is better than plastic.

It doesn't necessarily mean a built-in vertical grip, but an optional vertical grip would certainly be a professional accessory. Professionals would probably be more interested in a camera body that could accept a vertical grip, not so much for the ease of use in the portrait orientation, but for the extra battery life the second battery would provide.
I agree with this but would add in my opinion most of the pro bodies have at least 100,000 shutter clicks and are weather sealed.......

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Old Jan 20, 2012, 9:58 PM   #5
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We're talking "pro tech" now...I was just (again) using the term "pro body" to differentiate between cameras like the D4 from the D800 (2 different body shells).

Top of the line "pro" DSLRs usually have more than 100k "shutter clicks". It's more in the neighborhood of 300k. And by "pro" I'm referring to cameras like the D3's, 1D's and the upcoming D4.

I will always consider cameras like the upcoming D800 and 5D3 "prosumer" cameras even though "pro photographers" use hem along with advanced amateurs or hobbyists. Not to get hung up on the term "pro".
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Old Jan 21, 2012, 7:26 AM   #6
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For years I've been under the impression that the term "pro body" refers to a high end camera with a built-in portrait grip (e.g. Nikon's D2/D3/D4, Canon's 1D series). Big. Heavy. Correct?
So, what you're saying is that the sole criterion for what constitutes a "Pro Body" is the built-in portrait grip. Not the 'Full Frame' image sensor. Not the CF Card slot. Not 100% viewfinder coverage. Not the 1/8000 second shutter speed. Not the large number of AF points. Not the big, powerful batteries. Just the portrait grip, size and weight. Because, while the Nikon D4 is bigger than the D700, it's only 185g heavier. That's not very much.

I think I'll have to respectfully disagree with you as well.
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Old Jan 21, 2012, 7:55 AM   #7
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So, what you're saying is that the sole criterion for what constitutes a "Pro Body" is the built-in portrait grip. Not the 'Full Frame' image sensor. Not the CF Card slot. Not 100% viewfinder coverage. Not the 1/8000 second shutter speed. Not the large number of AF points. Not the big, powerful batteries. Just the portrait grip, size and weight. Because, while the Nikon D4 is bigger than the D700, it's only 185g heavier. That's not very much.

I think I'll have to respectfully disagree with you as well.
and I took disagree with you (and agree with Tcav)
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Old Jan 21, 2012, 7:57 AM   #8
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We're talking "pro tech" now...I was just (again) using the term "pro body" to differentiate between cameras like the D4 from the D800 (2 different body shells).

Top of the line "pro" DSLRs usually have more than 100k "shutter clicks". It's more in the neighborhood of 300k. And by "pro" I'm referring to cameras like the D3's, 1D's and the upcoming D4.

I will always consider cameras like the upcoming D800 and 5D3 "prosumer" cameras even though "pro photographers" use hem along with advanced amateurs or hobbyists. Not to get hung up on the term "pro".
I said at least 100,000 shutter clicks..... yes having 300,000 shutter clicks is also a plus for any pro.
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Old Jan 21, 2012, 12:08 PM   #9
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So, what you're saying is that the sole criterion for what constitutes a "Pro Body" is the built-in portrait grip. Not the 'Full Frame' image sensor. Not the CF Card slot. Not 100% viewfinder coverage. Not the 1/8000 second shutter speed. Not the large number of AF points. Not the big, powerful batteries. Just the portrait grip, size and weight. Because, while the Nikon D4 is bigger than the D700, it's only 185g heavier. That's not very much.

I think I'll have to respectfully disagree with you as well.
I guess I'm still not making myself clear. I can see how you and others might misunderstand and assume I am talking about what "features" make a camera a "pro body". I was NOT. Or not intentionally.

When I used the term "pro body" I was talking about the D4 and D800. I wanted to differentiate between the 2 even though they are both now considered "pro cameras". One has a body shell that includes a portrait grip.

I got the term "pro body" from the days when the marketing guys had grouped some models under "prosumer". You would hear such cameras (e.g. D300/D700) be described as "...consumer camera with some pro features" or "(D700)..a D3 in a consumer body (no portrait grip built-in to the shell)". At the same time they only described D3's as "pro bodies". Referring to the shell as well as the feature set. At the time only D3's were classified as "pro". Though eventually Nikon grouped the D700 with the D3's as "pro".

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Old Jan 21, 2012, 1:49 PM   #10
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Before you can assign the models to categories, you have to define the categories. This may be why the marketing departments have dropped the idea. There are more cameras sharing various high end features now. I would go with the most open definition: if a pro uses it for work, it's a pro body.

I had a pro body once, but age and inactivity have taken their toll .

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