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Old Jan 27, 2004, 2:50 AM   #1
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Default Advanced use and very compact...which camera?

Hi guys,

Can someone give me a advice for a digital camera, which should have the following, (from most important feature, to less important)

1. As small and 'cheap' looking as possible (I want to travel with it and it is important it does not look expensive )
2. The lesser delay between shots, the better (to make quick photos!)
3. Obvious to desire -> good image quality
4. The option to attach a polorizing filter to the lens
5. At least 3 MP
6. I am an 'advanced' user, so I would like to manual set up shutter etc. settings


My former camera was a Sony Mavica CD200, but what I didn't like about this camera is that it was too obvious...(ever tried to make a picture with this huge thing in India or a village in the middle of nowhere in Azia? Everyone looks at you as you come from Mars!)
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Old Jan 27, 2004, 3:27 AM   #2
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Take a look at the reviews of the Cannon A70 it may suit your requirements.
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Old Jan 27, 2004, 3:46 AM   #3
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But I think it is not possible to 'screw in' a (UV or polorisation) filter in the lens of the A70, isn't?
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Old Jan 27, 2004, 3:47 AM   #4
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If I were going to carry a small camera on a trip as my only camera my first consideration would be a Sony V1. I donít know of a small camera that takes filters though. http://www.steves-digicams.com/2003_reviews/v1.html

Shutter delay is excellent: http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/V1/V1A7.HTM

The laser holograph and night framing mode are unique and give exceptional low light capability. Low light focus is often a problem with small cameras.

It has full manual controls. It is the most pro-like small camera I know of. And the smallest I know of with a hot shoe for a flash.

5Mp and 4X optical zoom. I guess you are aware that digital zoom is next to useless

Find some aviator style polarized sunglasses. Rotate the sunglasses until you get the contrast or reflection reduction you want and just hold it over the lens Ė it has thru the lens metering so the shot will come out fine. I use that with my Oly C50 and it works fine. Here is a shot without sunglasses and one with: http://www.pbase.com/image/15070822/large Saw it on a car and just couldnít resist Ė I live in redneck country. I have a polarizer for my big camera and donít use it nearly as much as I did with my 35mm SLR. It is easy to get the dramatic sky/cloud contrast a polarizer gives with very little work in Photoshop. But it is still necessary for reflections. Since you donít have thru the lens viewing in a small camera sunglasses are easier than a filter. You would have to remove the filter to visually set the polarizer Ė Iím sure you are aware the thing is just a 3X neutral density filter if you canít rotate it to just the right angle. I guess you could use the LCD but they are small and hard to see in bright light.

Another consideration might be a Pentax 555. The 5X zoom is nice and the camera is very small. It doesnít have the hot shoe or laser focus, but doesnít do badly in low light. Not real fast though. Full manual exposure options.

A bargain camera that is small and competent is the Minolta G500. I think it is still sold under the Konica label in Europe. Reasonably fast with decent low light focus and manual exposure modes. 5Mp with a 3X optical zoom.

If you want screw in filter capability you will have to go to a bigger camera. There are many to choose from, but they arenít going to fit in your pocket and look inconspicuous. If you can attach a filter it means you have to keep track of a lens cap. I just attach a UV filter to protect the lens and lose the lens cap. I donít find filters nearly as necessary for digital photography as 35mm. If you are into IR it is necessary though.
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Old Jan 27, 2004, 4:08 AM   #5
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The reason I like to option to attach a polorisation filter (sorry for the spelling) is what it does to my pictures. I used one when I was in New Zealand and it really improved all of my pictures!

This Sony Z1 looks really interesting BTW!
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Old Jan 27, 2004, 4:58 AM   #6
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If you really want a screw in filter capability look at the Olympus 5060. The 28mm wide angle allows beautiful scenery. http://www.steves-digicams.com/2003_reviews/c5060.html It is reasonably fast: http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/C5060/C56A7.HTM It isnít small but it is more compact than it looks. Go into a store and handle one. Also takes less expensive CF cards.
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Old Jan 27, 2004, 9:06 AM   #7
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Thanks for your help, but this camera is just too big for me to fit in my pocket....

I see the Sonny DSC-V1 has the option to put a filter on it. How does it work, is it a screw-in type?

Is it the smallest camera available with the option to put a filter on?
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Old Jan 28, 2004, 4:02 AM   #8
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I think the A70 will allow filters to be attached by using the lens adapter. This seems to be a 52mm screw adapter but you'd need to check.
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Old Jan 29, 2004, 5:31 PM   #9
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Sony V1.
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Old Jan 29, 2004, 7:59 PM   #10
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If it wasn't for the polorasation filter I would recommend the Fuji F601 (3mP) or the follow up F610 (6mP).

Pro's: Fast shutter response (ala Fuji S602), iso 160 upto 1600 (in low res mode), flash exposure control, lots of manual control like a slr, small, but not too small.

Not so likeable; Small lenses have more distortion, not suited for architecture. Manual menu is burried deep in de menu, however if for instance apperture priority is selected, it will be there again after restart. No filter holder, one has to fabric a 'front nose' for the filters/lenses.

I think the F610 is better than the F601 at many aspects.
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