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Old Mar 11, 2012, 4:41 PM   #1
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Default Back up camera.

I have the opportunity of buying an identical digital camera to the one I use, and was wondering if there are any problems with storage, I would obviously remove the battery and card, should I take a few shots each month, or just leave it sleeping, what does age do to digital cameras, re lubrication? I know that with film cams, the shutter needs to be exercised regularly etc, but have no knowledge about this modern stuff. can someone enlighten me?
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Old Mar 11, 2012, 4:54 PM   #2
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G'day mate

With electronic gear - and I think here of the tranny radio on the kitchen window ledge, when they're on &/or used constantly they seem to go forever, but those items that are turned on/off all the time seem to die earlier

I suspect it's due to the micro-heating / cooling of circuits that eventually cause something to crack & fail

I would suggest using the 2 cameras interchangeably, week in, week about
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Old Mar 11, 2012, 6:34 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Ozzie_Traveller View Post
I would suggest using the 2 cameras interchangeably, week in, week about
Yeah. That.
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Old Mar 11, 2012, 7:10 PM   #4
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How long to you plan on keeping it? If it is something you plan on having for a long time, you might consider keeping it in a sealed container with desiccant, and doing an operational check annually.

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Old Mar 12, 2012, 4:29 PM   #5
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I don't see the point of a backup camera if you lock it away in storage. You want a backup camera with you so that if at a vital moment with a picture worthy scene in front of you, and your main camera packs it in, you have your backup right here with you.

Why keep it in a box in your house, when you can just as easily run to the nearest camera store and buy a new one if your main camera packs in.

Look at any pro, they will have two camera bodies, both with lens's mounted and if one packs up they have the other one ready.
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Old Mar 13, 2012, 4:30 AM   #6
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Schmintan, When I say a back up I don't mean to carry at all times, that would be utterly stupid, have you never had to send a camera in for repair? if I do get this camera, I think using them month about.
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Old Mar 13, 2012, 5:02 AM   #7
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Schmintan, When I say a back up I don't mean to carry at all times, that would be utterly stupid.
Thanks for your kind words denouncing me as "utterly stupid"!
No, its far from utterly stupid. Picture this (pardon the pun).

Your at an Air Show/Wedding/insert event here.
All of a sudden theres an amazing scene (plane crash where the pilot bails out/ brides maid's fall into the swimming pool or whatever.

Your camera decides to pack it in.

Do you:

a) thank whatever diety you worship that you have your backup camera in your bag, or even better, around your neck with a different lens, you take it out quick as a flash (again pardon the pun!) and capture the image.

b) think, "screw it, camera packed in, il get them to reschedule said wedding/air show for tomorrow after i get a chance to go home and get my spare camera.


I always carry two camera's. My main 5D MkII, and a Canon S90. Sure the S90 is in no way comparable to the 5D, but it would do the job well in a pinch. And im always on the lookout for a cheap 2nd hand crop body that i can have on me as a spare.

To each their own, but i think in a pinch if both of our cameras gave up the ghost, id still have a chance of getting the image where as you wouldnt, not having a working camera on you.
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Old Mar 13, 2012, 7:57 AM   #8
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Quote:
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that would be utterly stupid,
No, in fact it makes a lot of sense, if you truly think about it, wich you haven't.
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Old Mar 13, 2012, 9:49 AM   #9
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It makes perfect sense to have multiple bodies, espeically if you are at risk of a non-performance suite that can result from a botched event like a wedding.

I use two bodies at events one with a 24-70L the other with a 70-200L mounted, they are both constantly being used.
And I have a backup body for them in the gear box.

The two in-use bodies are normally hanging off a blackrapid double strap.

For nature/wildlife/commercial, one body is out in use, another is in the backpack with just a body cap. I will periodically switch them during the day.

Also pack alternates for the lenses, and flashes,
I have had bodies, lenses, flashes and CF cards pack it in during sessions.
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Old Mar 13, 2012, 11:20 AM   #10
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Somehow, I can't read into the original post that Grounded is a commercial/professional photographer who needs to have a backup camera with him at all times. Maybe 'spare' camera is more what was meant, but it was quite understandable.

Let's try another scenario: you are hiking with your camera(s) and fall into a rocky stream. Hiker A had one camera and lens damaged - a shame, but he has a spare camera at home. Hiker B had two cameras, with lenses, and a camera bag with spare lenses and other gear. Which one was stupid?

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