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Old Apr 10, 2012, 10:41 AM   #11
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People gets offended very easily in this forum...no matter what I say someone always gets offended.
We're not getting offended; we're trying to point out the error of your ways, and you seem to disregard the excellent advice you've been given. I understand that you've got your first dSLR, a T2i. Perhaps when you get your first lens, you'll be better equipped to form your own opinions instead of just copying and pasting someone else's.
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Old Apr 10, 2012, 10:47 AM   #12
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Scene modes are there for the people who have to have the nicest toys, but don't want to bother learning how to use them. They make up more than half the people with DSLRs. Majority rules. Remember, if it weren't for them, prices would be higher and camera development would be slower.
One of my cameras has a document mode, which sets it to B&W, closes down the aperture for greater DOF, and the focus seems more precise (though slower). I found it useful when creating a digital copy of a book, a few years ago. (at the author's request) I could have set it up that way myself, but changing back to normal shooting from the scene mode was much simpler.

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Old Apr 10, 2012, 11:43 AM   #13
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Electrolyte - you don't offend me. There are too many real issues in life for me to take offense over anything said in a photography forum. But, in addition to giving you help on photography related matters, as TCAV suggested, we're also trying to help you out on your interaction skills. Your choice of words is often poor in that there is an perceived arrogance to them. For example, you say
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but all those numerous kiddies-friendly modes in my opinion are ridiculous in a camera like the Canon T2i.
Look at it from our perspective - you've owned a tool for a week and you are already confidently stating certain functions are "ridiculous" and "kiddies-friendly". If you stopped short of making such statements, you'd probably not find such a strong backlash. Similarly in your last thread, you spoke in definitive terms about technology you hadn't used. So, I submit that you will get a lot better information and less backlash if you just ask questions and not state definitive opinions and using derogatory terms such as "ridiculous" about a tool you've spent a week with and no prior DSLR experience. Hopefully that makes some sense.
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Old Apr 10, 2012, 12:15 PM   #14
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Electrolyte - you don't offend me. There are too many real issues in life for me to take offense over anything said in a photography forum.
Good to know, because it isn't my intention to offend anyone.
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But, in addition to giving you help on photography related matters, as TCAV suggested, we're also trying to help you out on your interaction skills. Your choice of words is often poor in that there is an perceived arrogance to them.
Maybe my words aren't the best ones.
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Look at it from our perspective - you've owned a tool for a week and you are already confidently stating certain functions are "ridiculous" and "kiddies-friendly". If you stopped short of making such statements, you'd probably not find such a strong backlash. Similarly in your last thread, you spoke in definitive terms about technology you hadn't used. So, I submit that you will get a lot better information and less backlash if you just ask questions and not state definitive opinions and using derogatory terms such as "ridiculous" about a tool you've spent a week with and no prior DSLR experience. Hopefully that makes some sense.
I was not being specific... I just think it's a feature that doesn't matches the more "advanced" cameras imho, but it's just my opinion, I posted that to hear about yours. Also, I don't know why you have to "own" something to have the right to give an opinion about it. I don't own a Piper Cub also, but I can say it's a damn good airplane and quite dangerous too. This is because i have experiences with it, almost crashed due mechanical fails and now I have my own opinion. I'm not telling that my opinion is the only valid. And photography is something very subjective, but looks like people expect everyone to have the same opinion, and anyone different is treated like a barbarian.
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Scene modes are there for the people who have to have the nicest toys, but don't want to bother learning how to use them. They make up more than half the people with DSLRs. Majority rules. Remember, if it weren't for them, prices would be higher and camera development would be slower.
One of my cameras has a document mode, which sets it to B&W, closes down the aperture for greater DOF, and the focus seems more precise (though slower). I found it useful when creating a digital copy of a book, a few years ago. (at the author's request) I could have set it up that way myself, but changing back to normal shooting from the scene mode was much simpler.

brian
Yeah, I think you're absolutely right.

Regards.

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Just a last word: My opinion reflects what I think, not necessarily the truth.

Last edited by Electrolyte; Apr 10, 2012 at 12:18 PM.
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Old May 7, 2012, 4:33 AM   #15
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In the film era I quickly learned that when I was moving between places where I stopped to shoot, to carry my camera with a lens (or zoom setting) and exposure most likely to be appropriate given what I liked to shoot and my surroundings - be that Auto or a manual setting. Once in a shooting situation there was sometimes no time to do anything but put camera to eye, steady it and squeeze. If I did have time, I'd adjust as needed.

Continued the same habit with both my digital P&S and DSLR. I usually carry both in Auto mode. However, the P&S has a beach scene, I live at the beach, you do the math.

I use other Scene modes in special situations. The Canon S95 has two effects that have been fun to play with, fish eye and miniature. My Sony Alpha-33 has a hand held twilight mode intended for stationary subjects. It takes four images with different exposures and magicaly produces one result. Results are definitely better than anything I can shoot by hand at about 1/30 and below.

One good thing about carrying in Auto mode is when I go to Aperture or Shutter priority it reminds me to check EV and WB settings.
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Old May 7, 2012, 2:19 PM   #16
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I will occasionally switch to a scene mode when I find myself in unfamiliar territory (like Fireworks, for instance.) But otherwise, I'm comfortable picking my own exposure settings.
Same here.

In my case (and I'm sure this applies to TCav) I've been an avid photographer for decades.

I started with all mechanical SLR and Rangefinder cameras that were meterless. As a result I learned to use and did use (a lot) hand held exposure meters.

But I have some camera buddies that have just come into the hobby in the past couple of years and as they are learning, I do recommend that they use the little icons.

They work well and take the mystery out of advanced photography. As my friends evolve in their photography , I'm sure they will gravitate towards their own judgement.
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Old May 7, 2012, 4:54 PM   #17
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Using the "Scene" modes is a good way to learn what a proper setting should be for a particular scene. I'm talking about those of us that are still learning how to take a good shot. You can look at what the camera chose and then you can tweak it from there when you learn to shoot manual. I like to use Aperture but often use the "sunset" mode , it gives nice brilliant colors.
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Old May 8, 2012, 10:31 AM   #18
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I would use scene modes but my DSLR doesn't have them. I find it funny that scene modes are mostly only on point and shoot or entry level DSLR cameras now days. Yet the first cameras to have scene modes were 35 MM SLR cameras but now no one seems to think of them a real photographer's tool.
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Old May 8, 2012, 5:15 PM   #19
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G'day Electrolyte

You pose the topic
"I've been wondering why almost all cameras nowadays have a lot of different modes, for example: Macro, Sports, Landscape, Portrait, Night...
Personally, I never used any of these modes.
I think it's okay to have a full-auto mode besides the PASM modes, but all those numerous kiddies-friendly modes in my opinion are ridiculous in a camera like the Canon T2i."

May I add my 2-bob's worth to this discussion
You are quite right in saying that "this is my opinion" - and equally right in observing that some "people get offended very easily in this forum".
It's all okay mate - it's human nature [and quite okay] to have differing opinions

To come back to your OP ...
I run photo training workshops thru country Australia - about 2-dozen, weekend workshops each year over a 6-8 month travelling period
From the dozens of adult students who attend those workshops, I find that:-
1/3 of students have a slip-in-the-pocket camera, used 100% on auto;
1/3 of students have a superzoom camera, used on auto for maybe 90%, and
1/3 of students have a dSLR camera, and 90% are using it on auto when they arrive

When they depart the workshop, all of the latter 2 groups are no longer using 'auto' - however for those students who just do not want to get involved with speeds & apertures [like you and I obviously are happy to do], then for them I suggest both Program mode & that the scenes modes might be of some use to them from time to time

If the retail photographic industry continues to target 'happy-snap' people into the dSLR camera market, then these people will choose whatever mode is easy for them to use. If this is 'auto' or 'program' or 'scenes', then so be it. For us as keen photographers; people who are prepared to learn more about the technicalities etc etc, then we have no need for these items ... but they are still there for others who are not as keen as we are.


Regards, Phil
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Old May 9, 2012, 2:34 AM   #20
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I seldom use them, though sports and portrait can be useful, don"t knock them until you have tried them.
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