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Old Feb 2, 2004, 7:02 PM   #1
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Default Saving Original photos

I have got some excellant feedback on saving original photos from my camera. But is okay to do a "save as" a image icon with the original? Than is it okay to trash the original icon JPEG after I do the save as image icon. I use Photoshop Elements 2.0. I shoot in JPEG SHQ.
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Old Feb 2, 2004, 7:42 PM   #2
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uhhh, what?
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Old Feb 2, 2004, 8:07 PM   #3
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The whole concept here is to keep unaltered originals and to digitally manipulate only copies. Best way is to copy the files from your camera to your hard disk, then IMMEDIATELY copy them to another source such as another harddrive or CD.

Bottom line -- they're your pictures, do with them as you wish.
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Old Feb 2, 2004, 8:11 PM   #4
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Default Do not trash the original!

Do not delete your original image even after doing a "save as." This way if you edit your "save as" image "beyond repair (or recovery)," you can go back to the original image and start over.

When I do a "save as" in Photoshop Elements 2, I save in one of two formats - JPEG or PSD. I do PSD if I know I'm going to do more editing as it is a "lossless" format; i.e., it does not deteriorate with multiple saves. I use JPEG if I think I'm done editing (usually a quick "red eye" / color / lighting fix and / or crop) and I'm doing a quick print (I use Qimage exclusively to print). Nameing convention is to either apend an "_A" or give the revised file a completely new name such as "Mike_and_Cami" (for son and grand-daughter). I don't rename the original file (don't ask me why!?!)

Hope this helps.

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Old Feb 2, 2004, 8:28 PM   #5
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You shouldnít save as a JPG if you are going to print an image. You have multiplied your compression artifacts by resaving as a JPG which is something that should be avoided. Save as a TIFF to take to another program for printing. If you are that hard pressed for hard drive space you can delete it after you print.
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Old Feb 3, 2004, 9:25 AM   #6
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Quote:
Nameing convention is to either apend an "_A" or give the revised file a completely new name such as "Mike_and_Cami" (for son and grand-daughter). I don't rename the original file (don't ask me why!?!)
For archiving and easy searching, I rename my PSD version but keep the number that the camera puts at the end of its cryptic name. So, for instance, I might load a file that's named P1311046.ORF (Olympus raw format), then save it as StupidPhoto46.psd. Since I don't always remember to rename the original files, I can still find the original StupidPhoto easily by looking for that number. Oh, and the original photos go in a sub-folder that I always name "RAW." After burning CDs and verifying that they're error-free, I delete the RAW folders from my hard drive.

In the meantime, Ohenry is so completely correct about burning a CD immediately. I've experienced several hard drive crashes over the years, but I'm still lazy and taking risks. Listen to him, not me.
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Old Feb 3, 2004, 3:26 PM   #7
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Default Re: Do not trash the original!

When I do a "save as" in Photoshop Elements 2, I save in one of two formats - JPEG or PSD. I do PSD if I know I'm going to do more editing as it is a "lossless" format; i.e., it does not deteriorate with multiple saves. I use JPEG if I think I'm done editing (usually a quick "red eye" / color / lighting fix and / or crop) and I'm doing a quick print (I use Qimage exclusively to print). Nameing convention is to either apend an "_A" or give the revised file a completely new name such as "Mike_and_Cami" (for son and grand-daughter). I don't rename the original file (don't ask me why!?!)

The above used to be my advice. Starting with Photoshop 7, Adobe came out with a new upgrade to JPEG - JPEG 12. For the life of me I can't see a difference between the original and a file that I've loaded and resaved twenty times.

So at this point I now archive in JPEG 12.

Try it yourself. Load the original and save as JPEG 12. Drop the image, reload it and save it again. Do this twnety times - COmpare to the original.

Dave
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Old Feb 3, 2004, 3:50 PM   #8
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Someone has to explain what JPEG 12 is. I'm up to Photoshop CS, and this is the first time I've heard about it. Could it be lossless compression? Dare I hope?

Edit: I just checked. There's no such animal. You must mean the highest quality compression, which is probably 12.
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Old Feb 3, 2004, 4:25 PM   #9
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The only other version of JPEG I've encountered is JPEG2000 using a wavelet coding algorithm, claimed to allow higher compression and fewer artefacts. The problem with all the compression variants is inevitably you can trade off something good like sharpness and edge definition, to get rid of something else. Also there can be higher processing demands for both encoding and decoding - which is fine for stills shot with fast cpu's and high end pc's in non realtime playback, but difficult for moviecams doing realtime moving image capture.

I know the newer variants of MPEG movie for example, do 'post image processing' - that is, after getting the unavoidable artefacts, there is post smoothing to make them less obvious. For cameras up to 6Mpix, processing speeds increasing and memory price decreasing there is less excuse to shoot highly compressed now than when the first small memory cards came out.

Always be careful about 'proprietary' forms of file creation type and compression. These are usually found within a particular vendors software products. Sometimes, a format becomes widely used and adopted as a 'standard' e.g .pdf, but you still find translation (as opposed to just reading) is usually only done by Adobe packages. JPEG has its roots as an open standard with international agreement and important areas like 'backwards compatibility' are considered as newer standards evolve. I used to think that bitmaps were the simplest vanilla format you could get for digital image representation, but I think even bitmaps might be Microsoft. VOX
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Old Feb 3, 2004, 5:12 PM   #10
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There isnít such a thing as JPG 12 as a format. Photoshop allows you to save at quality 1-12 in standard JPG format with 12 being the highest. A 5Mp image ends up around 3.5Mb at 12 quality where a TIFF is 14.4Mb. I admit JPG quality 12 in Photoshop is pretty close to loseless, but TIFF is completely loseless. Hard to tell the difference even after several saves. Quality 12 is probably a good way to archive modified images to CD or a limited HD.

The files donít open any faster because Photoshop has to decompress the JPG to full size. And filters and such donít run any faster because the decompressed image is the same size whether the source was JPG of TIFF.

The conservative approach is to use TIFF, but JPG quality 12 is so close it isnít likely to make any difference.
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