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Old Feb 7, 2004, 12:56 AM   #11
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Thanks for your inputs everyone. This thread made me start a quest to correctly calibrate my monitor. I haven't "invested" in expensive hardware solutions just yet, and I tried this Monitor Calibration Wizard program. In the end it made a profile it suggested was suitable for correcting whatever was wrong colour-wise, and I applied that profile but the results left alot to be desired. Greens of leaves and trees were far too yellow, and I got weird shadow colours (eg. dark greys had a magenta like effect).

I eventually deleted that profile and stuck with what I had started with. I did d/l and apply a suitable sRGB colour space thingy for my monitor (Hitachi), but I gotta say I can't notice a difference.

Also I think the link eric s gave, there was a chart for gamma, stating most PCs were 2.2 while Macs were 1.8, my monitor subjectively came in at 2.3-2.4. Is there a non video driver way of bringing it down a touch or should I even worry?!

I'm no photo pro, and I use my computer more for playing games and DVD watching/encoding than photo viewing...
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Old Feb 7, 2004, 3:56 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohenry
Correct that the Spyder doesn't profile printers. I make use of the printer profiles provided by RedRiver for their papers and my printer. Blind luck perhaps, but they work, and before using the Spyder they weren't even close.

You can always do better if you're willing to spend more. It's akin to buying a Sigma 70-200 lens rather than the Canon 70-200 lens. You still get a good lens, but you could have spent 2-3 times as much for a better lens.

For the purposes of home use, the Spyder performs admirably well. The other well known colorimeter (Gregtabeth EyeOne) is in the same price range as the Spyder. Depending on which review and who you speak with, you'll get varying opinions on which system is better. I haven't compared the two side-by-side, so I reserve comment as to which is better. I can only attest that I am happy with the results that I get, both with the Spyder and using the ICC profiles provided by RedRiver for their paper/Canon printer.
I totally agree with OHenry here... You can eyeball it, but for home use the only way to be sure is to use some instrument like the low-cost Spyder. Beside one needs to re-calibrate every month and it's much faster and easier this way... My eyes of course do not recall what I saw last month (or a particular color shade out of 16 million) I absolutely need my SpyderPro!

BTW the Co. that makes the affordable Spyder offers a simple Printer Calibration also! 8)
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Old Feb 7, 2004, 8:41 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onyx
, I'm no photo pro, and I use my computer more for playing games and DVD watching/encoding than photo viewing...
In the case of non-digital imaging use, calibration of the monitor can be done by eyeball so that it adjusts to suit your personal tastes. You COULD go out and buy a spectrometer, but what would be the case if you're just playing games or surfing the web. If it looks good for what you're using it for, don't bother
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Old Feb 7, 2004, 9:13 AM   #14
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It's a little less garish on paper than sRGB, but warmer than Adobe 1998 (which is the colour space that I use for taking the RAW files on my D100).
If you're going to print pictures, choose Adobe 1998 over sRGB, which has fewer colors than Adobe and is used only for onscreen viewing. You probably already know this, but I wanted to make it clear for anyone reading this thread.
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Old Feb 11, 2004, 7:01 PM   #15
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Spyder Pro bundled with PrintFix now only $449:
http://www.dpreview.com/news/0402/04...ormanament.asp
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Old Feb 11, 2004, 7:08 PM   #16
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Quote:
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Spyder Pro bundled with PrintFix now only $449:
[
Ordered it this morning.
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Old Feb 11, 2004, 10:33 PM   #17
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I have a slightly different spin on this and would appreciate some input. FYI, I do not have my pictures printed at a photo lab just off of my Canon S900.

If I use the windows or Microsoft viewing software my pictures match very well to what is printed.

However, (and this gives away that I donít use my Adobe PS Elements very much) if I open the same picture in PSE2 I get a very dark looking picture. Now if I color and contrast correct in there it seems to print and match well.

But if I never open it in there I donít have to color correct. Is that because my camera is set to a different color space than Adobe? Or because my monitor is not color corrected or because I am imagining things?
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Old Mar 5, 2004, 9:18 AM   #18
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Never occurred to me that lack of monitor calibration would mean that my printed product might look very different from my preview on the monitor. :shock:

oh well.. better late than never...
Would go purchase my SpyderPro tomorrow

thanx guys
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Old Mar 5, 2004, 9:33 AM   #19
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Is that because my camera is set to a different color space than Adobe? Or because my monitor is not color corrected or because I am imagining things?
I wouldn't even pretend to understand these things, but I do know you should calibrate your monitor, even if it's just with the calibration utility that comes with Adobe products.
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Old Mar 5, 2004, 8:05 PM   #20
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If I were to get spyder, which do you reccomend? Spyder or SpyderPro. I don't print my own prints. I usually upload them to a site or go to my local wolf. When they print them, do they then do their own color optimization to print what they think I want or is there something in my file that helps them?

thanks
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