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Old Feb 9, 2004, 10:46 AM   #1
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Default Need Help for Casio QV-5700

I brought new QV5700 couple of months back, I am not a professional photographer but my friend had QV3000 and we took so many pictures those are very good. Regarding this 5700 if i take any pictures outside comes very good while if i use inside not getting good.

I have zero knowledge on all these features, i used auto mode and best picture mode and rest of all modes. The main question is when i take any pictures inside house all the pictures are coming dark background, when i see in the lcd looks great lighting but when it use the flash all the pictures are coming background Dark.

By using Qv3000 even if i use flash it is coming good but with 5700 if i use flash it is changing the natural color also. If i am not using flash with lots of lighting looks fine.

Please let me know if i need to change any setting or give me some tips.

thanks
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Old Feb 9, 2004, 9:30 PM   #2
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Default QV-5700 flash; also focus difficulties

I have a QV-5700, and I also find that the built-in flash often gives underexposed results. I suggest you use the EV compensation facility to add a stop or so, and experiment until you get it right. After all, it's a lot easier to experiment with a digicam than a film camera. You can also try turning up the flash intensity via the menu system.

As the QV-5700 has a sync socket for external flash, I sometimes use a cheap external automatic flashgun, held up on the on the end of a flash extension lead. I set the camera to manual exposure on 1/125th and the aperture recommended by the flashgun, switch off the internal flash, and let the flashgun give the right exposure. This works well.

I am having a lot of trouble at present with erratic autofocus on landscape shots. I set it on the 'infinity' or spot autofocus modes & lock focus on a distant object. Then the EXIF data for the disappointing result later reveals that the focus point was 1.5m instead of 20m. Have you had any focus difficulties? There aren't many QV-5700s about round here, which worries me.
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Old Feb 11, 2004, 3:06 PM   #3
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Yes same thing worries me also, I haven't seen any comments or issues about this QV5700. I don't hae external flash to use right now but is it worth? or go for cheap camera to use indoor.

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Old Feb 11, 2004, 4:15 PM   #4
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If the flash is exposing the subject correctly there isnít much you can do about the background with the internal flash. If you crank up the EV to properly expose the background you are going to overexpose the subject. If the background is completely black and not too far away you might be underexposing the subject a little as well Ė increasing the flash intensity and or EV might help some in that case. But if the background is twice the distance as the subject you only have a quarter the light illuminating it. Further than that and the background is going to be dark unless there is a lot of ambient light. Another solution is to use more telephoto so that you back off a little from the subject and the ratio between the subject and camera isnít as great compared to the background.

About the only really good solution is bounce flash. The distance between the ceiling and subject becomes closer to the ceiling and background than straight from the camera. Combined with the most telephoto your situation will allow it will give decent backgrounds unless the background is a really long distance away. You donít need an expensive dedicated unit as Alan T says. You can get a very competent little automatic flash unit with bounce flash for under $50 and it vastly improves flash shots. I like a unit with multiple power and aperture settings, but those are not pricey either.

You are probably going to have the same problem with any camera with built-in flash. You are the victim of the physics of light propagation rather than specific limitations of the camera IMO. You really get better pictures with an external unit Ė even a small and inexpensive one.

Some flash units have more voltage than digital cameras can tolerate, so compare the specs of the unit with you owners manual. That might be more of a problem with a hot shoe Ė I donít know about that. My cameras have hot shoes and the voltage of many units is far too much for my cameras. Perhaps Alan knows more about the voltage problems with the sync socket Ė or even whether there is one.
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Old Feb 12, 2004, 3:54 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slipe
If the flash is exposing the subject correctly there isnít much you can do about the background with the internal flash. If you crank up the EV to properly expose the background you are going to overexpose the subject.
I think there is a genuine specific issue with flash exposure on the QV-5700. Note that 'Kiffu' says he gets good results with the QV-3000, implying equivalent conditions. I just turn up the exposure a bit on my QV-5700 and then it's fine.

You're right, of course, about an external one being much better, but that'll cost him some money.
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Old Feb 12, 2004, 4:06 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kiffu
I don't hae external flash to use right now but is it worth? or go for cheap camera to use indoor.
Before you do either of those, why not try some test shots with different EV compensation figures (or use manual exposure settings)? After all, that'll cost you no more than a bit of time and battery power.

Many folk seem surprisingly reluctant round here to try things out, do the experiments, and inspect the results immediately, and compare the settings automatically recorded in the EXIF data. That facility is arguably the biggest advantage digital has over film.

Many professsional photgraphers routinely bracket exposures (provided the subject hasn't run away), even though they're likely to have guessed the exposure correctly.
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