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Old Jul 17, 2013, 8:38 PM   #1
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Default Which wide-angle?

Great night all!
OK folks….I bought my Nikon 12-24 and it should arrive tomorrow.
I will use it mainly to shoot indoor real estate photography. One thing I didn’t think about was the lens inability to use a circular polarize due to the bulbous piece of gorgeous Nikon glass.
I need a 12-20mm lens that I can put a polarizer on to shoot outside. That is all that I will use it for.
Any suggestions from this informed group? Brand is not really important as long as it is sharp.
Thanks to all in advance!
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Old Jul 18, 2013, 6:46 AM   #2
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Putting any filter on any ultra-wide angle lens is likely to create vignetting, and since Polarizing filters are thicker than most other filters, that's doubly so for polarizing filters. Plus Polarizing filters can create vignetting on wide angle lenses anyway.

But if you really want, you might want to consider a polarizing filter from Cokin. Their filters are mounted on special filter holders farther out in front of the lens' objective element.

An alternative might be to shoot your outdoor panoramic photos with a Sony camera and use its iSweep Panorama feature.





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Old Jul 21, 2013, 10:09 AM   #3
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Aside from vignetting, polarizers on wide angle lenses will give you an uneven sky or reflection reduction due to the vast area the lens captures, and the gradated nature of a CPL. The lens coating on "fisheye" or ultra wide lenses should help reduce any flare, and you can always darken a sky in post processing. I have a 10 - 17 fisheye that creates great outdoor shots with plenty of contrast and saturation without the aid of any filters.
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Old Jul 21, 2013, 9:12 PM   #4
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I never use a polarizer on my Sigma 10-20, while I do on the Tamron 17-50 (but not on the example below.) When shooting a house, the biggest factor is to make sure you schedule it so you are not fighting that big ball in the sky. For example, east facing house, morning will light the front of the house and give nice contrasty sky, while afternoon will have shadows in front and blown out sky. North facing homes are the most difficult as you are shooting south into the sun as it arcs south (in the northern hemisphere) as it goes from east to west and is lower in the winter.

I can't recall the last time I used a polarizer on the 17-50 when shooting an exterior. If anything, I can always correct it in post with a graduated filter. That also has an advantage over a polarizer which has a universal effect, while the graduated filter applied in post can be more specific.

Examples below were all with a D7000 and handheld, shot in RAW but minimal changes in post. Unfortunately, it was not intended as a lens test so the similar scenes with the Tamron and Sigma are different exposures. I don't know the characteristics of the Nikon 12-24, but I find the Sigma to be quite contrasty as seen below.

Sigma 10-20, f10, 1/2500, ISO 400, 13mm


Tamron 17-50 (non-VR), f10, 1/800, ISO400, 22mm Wish I has that extra 1/3 stop for better comparison.


These next 2 are the same file. Rule #1 in realestate photography is vertical must be vertical. I saved the first one prior to correcting the vertical. That is the only difference.

Sigma 10-20, f6.3, ISO 3200, 1/50, 11mm, available light only




On a typical real estate shoot, generally ISO 100-200 exterior and 400-800 interior. Generally around f8 or whatever window lighting requires. On the UWA lens, f8 gives phenomenal DOF - like 3' to infinity. Also use tripod for all shots and light interior with multiple speedlights/pocket wizards. I was traveling light in Europe and left all that home.

Last edited by tizeye; Jul 21, 2013 at 9:54 PM.
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Old Jul 21, 2013, 9:28 PM   #5
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I played with that Tamron shot posted earlier, darkening and bringing contrast into the sky while leaving the lightness of the land through the application of a graduated filter. A polarizing filter would have affected the entire scene.

Quite a difference!

Also, could do similar (and probably sill when I get to them in Lightroom) with the Sigma shot, but lightning the land area which is a tad underexposed, but not affect the sky.

Incidentally, that was Sion, Switzerland and those shots where at different elevations. The Tamron was on the hike up to the monastery/fort, before entering, while the Sigma was at the top of the wall around the monastery/fort. It is just ironic that they captured a similar scene with that near hill on the left edge. That was for the monks and there was another fort where the citizens would retreat to if invaded...but I didn't hike over there. The church is in Lucerne, not the monastery remains.


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Old Jul 31, 2013, 5:21 PM   #6
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I use a Tokina 12-24mm f/4 lens that is marvelously sharp! It's my most used lens, though my new Tamron 17-50 f/2.8 is starting to compete. The Tokina takes 72mm filters - I'm using a B&W Polarizer.
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Old Aug 6, 2013, 4:50 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JStrong View Post
I use a Tokina 12-24mm f/4 lens that is marvelously sharp! It's my most used lens, though my new Tamron 17-50 f/2.8 is starting to compete. The Tokina takes 72mm filters - I'm using a B&W Polarizer.
I have a Pentax 12-24...ASP-C sensor....and while I don't use a polarizer on it....it has always had a B+W clear filter.

Never had any issue with vignetting.
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